Browse Prior Art Database

Sound Echo Detection in Hearing Aids

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202058D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Dec-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Dec-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

People using hearing aids are reliant on their devices to be working properly. This means that they require their hearing aids to be providing the optimal gain respectively amplification for their hearing loss at all times. This is not always the case. Hearing aids may not be able to deliver the right amount of amplification to the user for several reasons. Hearing aids may work improperly or there may be obstructions or a blockage in the auditory canal, e.g. an obstruction in the outer ear such as an earwax, a blockage in the ear canal, or a middle ear pathology respectively dysfunction such as an ear infection. In addition, many hearing aid users, including children and/or elderly people, may have difficulties in recognizing when there is a problem with their hearing device or/and are not able to identify early changes or indications of problems. The ability to compare whether the sound delivered at the ear is the same as intended is currently only available at the dispenser’s office with use of expensive external equipment. It is not integrated in the hearing aid and it cannot be utilized by patients at home.

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Sound Echo Detection in Hearing Aids

Idea: KerrynAnn Miller, SG-Singapore; Ker Ser Ang, SG-Singapore; Ming Ten Viona Ng, SG-
Singapore; Aun Yong Hong, SG-Singapore; Sathianathan Manjakkollaipitchai, SG-Singapore

People using hearing aids are reliant on their devices to be working properly. This means that they require their hearing aids to be providing the optimal gain respectively amplification for their hearing loss at all times. This is not always the case. Hearing aids may not be able to deliver the right amount of amplification to the user for several reasons. Hearing aids may work improperly or there may be obstructions or a blockage in the auditory canal, e.g. an obstruction in the outer ear such as an earwax, a blockage in the ear canal, or a middle ear pathology respectively dysfunction such as an ear infection. In addition, many hearing aid users, including children and/or elderly people, may have difficulties in recognizing when there is a problem with their hearing device or/and are not able to identify early changes or indications of problems.

The ability to compare whether the sound delivered at the ear is the same as intended is currently only available at the dispenser's office with use of expensive external equipment. It is not integrated in the hearing aid and it cannot be utilized by patients at home.

The problem can be solved by including a system in the hearing aid that can be used to monitor the sound reaching the ear, and sending an alert to the user when the sound reaching the ear is either softer or louder than intended. That way the problem can be resolved earlier, resulting in less disruption to the patient's communica...