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A Method for Dynamic Utilization of Global Resources to Optimize Production Capacity

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202139D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Dec-06
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Dec-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Manufacturing organizations that operate multiple manufacturing facilities associated with different business units are subject to changes in the economy, and the success of the organization. These changes can affect the stability of the resources on hand causing facilities to be under or over worked. These situations ultimately effect customer satisfaction. Currently, each manufacturing facility has the following process: Step 1A - The hearing instrument request is created via electronic ordering or web interface or standalone application. Step 2A - The request is queued up in the factory database. Step 3A - The production order is created. Step 4A - The production order is moved to the shell lab for designing. Step 5A - The production order is queued up for shell lab operators. Step 6A - The shell lab operator selects order manually and starts detailing and modeling. Step 7A - The production order is queued up for production. Step 8A - The production orders are picked for production. Step 9A - The production order are manufactured and shipped to the customer.

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A Method for Dynamic Utilization of Global Resources to Optimize Production Capacity

Idea: Amit Vaze, US-Piscataway, New Jersey; James Edward DeFinis, US-Piscataway, New

Jersey; Lavlesh Lamba, US-Piscataway, New Jersey; Ireneusz Rybark; US-Piscataway, New

Jersey

Manufacturing organizations that operate multiple manufacturing facilities associated with different

business units are subject to changes in the economy, and the success of the organization. These

changes can affect the stability of the resources on hand causing facilities to be under or over worked.

These situations ultimately effect customer satisfaction. Currently, each manufacturing facility has the following process:

Step 1A - The hearing instrument request is created via electronic ordering or web interface or

standalone application.

Step 2A - The request is queued up in the factory database.

Step 3A - The production order is created.

Step 4A - The production order is moved to the shell lab for designing.

Step 5A - The production order is queued up for shell lab operators.

Step 6A - The shell lab operator selects order manually and starts detailing and modeling. Step 7A - The production order is queued up for production.

Step 8A - The production orders are picked for production.

Step 9A - The production order are manufactured and shipped to the customer.

The following proposed system architecture optimizes the global workforce utilization for a

manufacturer within the hearing device industry. The architecture is called "Load Balancing" and works

by reallocating available work from facilities that require additional resources to other facilities

requiring additional workload for their available resources. To do this effectively, the work is digitized

and maintained over a global computer network. In digital format, a production order can be

transmitted anywhere to the organizations associated facilities where it is ultimately produced as a

physical product. Work shifts and time zones where the facilities operate are also taken into

consideration to make possible a constant, stable and cooperative production flow, with reduced

backlog at any one facility. As a result, the workforce at each facility can stabilize, helping to avoid a

need for mass hires or layoffs and salary adjustments to compensate for changes in local economies. The Load Balancing System Architecture works by monitoring each facility's workload. When backlog

begins to grow in a facility's local production queue, the system off-loads the work into other facilities'

production queues maintaining balance in capacity.

The Local Manufacturing Facility Operations create production orders and make them available on the

global network:
Step 1A - The hearing instrument requests from customers are created via electronic ordering

standalone application or web based interface. At this point the hea...