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Integrated EHID System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202141D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Dec-06
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Dec-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 232K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

EHID lamps (EHID: Electrodeless High Intensity Discharge) are characterized by superior maintenance and can even have better color rendering indices and efficacy the electroded HID lamps. Instead of electrodes that couple the energy into the lightning plasma, EHID lamps use couplers, also referred to as applicators, that couple microwave power into the plasma. This microwave or RF power (RF: Radio Frequency) is provide by a power amplifier or a power oscillator circuit which are powered by a DC power supply (DC: Direct Current). Modern EHID systems use solid-state power amplifiers supplied with low DC voltage. Currently electrode HID systems are quite bulky because of their need for a lot of system components. Especially the power supply, the power amplifier including an arrangement for cooling and the coupler are of considerable volume. For reasons of cost, high wattage systems are used to achieve a good dollar to watt ratio. E. g., sulfur lamps need to have a minimal size, otherwise they become inefficient for reasons of plasma physics. Therefore EDHID systems normally are working in the kW range. No compact EHID systems are known so far. However, electrode compact fluorescent lamps are commonly known today. Electrodeless compact fluorescent lamps are also available on the market but sold in much smaller quantities. There are also descriptions about electrodeless low-pressure discharge lamps using mercury gas to provide UV radiation (UV: UltraViolet) which is converted by a fluorescent coating on the discharge vessel to produce visible radiation.

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Integrated EHID System

Idea: Bernhard Sießegger, DE-Munich

EHID lamps (EHID: Electrodeless High Intensity Discharge) are characterized by superior maintenance and can even have better color rendering indices and efficacy the electroded HID lamps. Instead of electrodes that couple the energy into the lightning plasma, EHID lamps use couplers, also referred to as applicators, that couple microwave power into the plasma. This microwave or RF power (RF: Radio Frequency) is provide by a power amplifier or a power oscillator circuit which are powered by a DC power supply (DC: Direct Current). Modern EHID systems use solid-state power amplifiers supplied with low DC voltage.

Currently electrode HID systems are quite bulky because of their need for a lot of system components. Especially the power supply, the power amplifier including an arrangement for cooling and the coupler are of considerable volume. For reasons of cost, high wattage systems are used to achieve a good dollar to watt ratio. E. g., sulfur lamps need to have a minimal size, otherwise they become inefficient for reasons of plasma physics. Therefore EDHID systems normally are working in the kW range. No compact EHID systems are known so far. However, electrode compact fluorescent lamps are commonly known today. Electrodeless compact fluorescent lamps are also available on the market but sold in much smaller quantities. There are also descriptions about electrodeless low-pressure discharge lamps using mercury gas to provide UV radiation (UV: UltraViolet) which is converted by a fluorescent coating on the discharge vessel to produce visible radiation.

In the following a novel solution for an integrated EHID lamp is proposed. This low power EHID system integrates power supply, power amplifier, coupler, discharge vessel, and optics into a compact housing. The resulting product can be uses as a retrofit for existing products. Designing a more compact EHID system, the used components have to be smaller than the ones used in state-of-the-art technology. This is achieved by the following features:

• Low Power Level, less than 100 W, preferable less than 35 W, AC power (AC: Alternating Current) drawn from the line: Lower power levels are preferable because cooling for a compact shape works better than at higher power, i. e., smaller surface to loss ratio. The increasing thermal stress on the electronic components is making the system increasingly unreliable.

• High Efficiency: Less space and weight are needed for cooling arrangement and reduced components temperature.

• High Frequencies: They are used to achieve a compact coupler arrangement, e.g., made out of ceramic. To reduce mechanical dimensions, materials with high permittivity are used.

• High Temperature Rated cComponents: E. g., high temperature PCB material for the electronics is used (PCB: Printed C...