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System and Method of Enabling Compression for Storing Large Objects In Databases

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202322D
Publication Date: 2010-Dec-14
Document File: 4 page(s) / 256K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method and system for storing binary large objects in a compressed format in a relational database.

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System and Method of Enabling Compression for Storing Large Objects In Databases

A method and system is disclosed for storing binary large objects in a compressed format in a relational database, the compression enabled at the relational database level.

Large objects compression can be achieved by compressing the large objects using a third-party compression tool, and then storing it in the database as a binary large object. However, this mechanism is unsatisfactory as it requires additional processing of compressing during storing and decompressing during retrieval at a client side, and also, doesn't allow using the compression facility at the relational database level.

The method described herein, includes encoding binary data as ASCII, and storing this ASCII data as VARCHAR, as compared to CLOB, in the relational database, thereby to make use of the row compression facility of the relational databases.

Since the binary data is stored as ASCII data in VARCHAR data types, the space coming out of any large objects deletion can be retrieved back by doing a REORG, and hence storage space can be gained back.

The processing, though has to be done even now, can either be handled at a server side, or at a client side, rather than forcing the processing to be done at the client side alone. However, the data processing here is faster, as the binary data is brought into buffer pool, unlike in large objects, wherein the large object Locator is brought into the buffer pool space, and any processing has to be done in the file system space.

In an instance, binary data may be encoded as ASCII using Base 64 encoding. Base 64 is a positional numeral system using a base of 64. It is the largest power of two base that can be represented using only printable ASCII characters. This has led to its use as a transfer encoding for e-mail among other things. All well-known variants that are known by the name Base64 use the characters A-Z, a-z, and 0-9 in that order for the first 62 digits but the symbols chosen for the last two digits vary considerably between differ...