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Speech Intelligibility Benefit due to Visual Cues

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202374D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Dec-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Dec-14
Document File: 1 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Speech intelligibility decreases in the area of 1000 to 3000 Hz. Thus, sufficient gain has to be provided. However, this situation can also occur at cocktail parties or at e.g. conference talks where the distance between the talker and listener is increased. In these situations the speaker does not want to raise the voice because he/she does not feel comfortable with sound perception or even wants to preserve the own voice. In hearing aid, providing sufficient gain for restoring the speech intelligibility induces often feedback problems.

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Speech Intelligibility Benefit due to Visual Cues

Idea: Dr. Ronny Hannemann, DE-Erlangen; Dr. Maja Sermann, DE-Erlangen

Speech intelligibility decreases in the area of 1000 to 3000 Hz. Thus, sufficient gain has to be provided. However, this situation can also occur at cocktail parties or at e.g. conference talks where the distance between the talker and listener is increased. In these situations the speaker does not want to raise the voice because he/she does not feel comfortable with sound perception or even wants to preserve the own voice. In hearing aid, providing sufficient gain for restoring the speech intelligibility induces often feedback problems.

Therefore, a novel solution is proposed which improves the speech intelligibility especially in the described situations. It is proposed to use a camera with zoom/focus functionality. TA camera can be part of e.g. hearing aids, glasses, remote controls or cell phones. The user focuses manually the camera at the mouth of the speaker by using target focus, for instance. The mouth of the speaker is displayed on a screen which can be part of e.g. remote controls, cell phones or in the visual field inside the glasses. The mouth of the speaker provides the listener with visual cues which support the articulation information in the area of 1000-3000 Hz.

In addition, it is proposed to provide the used came...