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Ultrasound-guided intrauterine, fallopian, or ovarian injection for nonsurgical sterilization, contraception, or other treatment of dogs, humans, and other mammals

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202690D
Publication Date: 2010-Dec-22
Document File: 6 page(s) / 156K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

E. Lissner: AUTHOR

Related Documents

http://www.parsemusfoundation.org/Parsemus/Nonsurgical_dog_sterilization-_females.html: URL

Abstract

Ultrasound can be used to guide an injection into the uterus, uterine horns, fallopian tubes, or ovaries of female mammals, including dogs and humans. Ultrasound-guided intrauterine injectable sterilization / injection / injectable contraception (UG-IUIS / UG-IUI / UGIUIS / UGIIS or UGIIC) can be performed with a number of substances, including calcium chloride solution, alcohol, or a polymer sterilant such as RISUG (“Vasalgel”) or FerroCept. At least in dogs, it is much easier to inject into the lumen of the uterine horns than into the ovaries, which are tough to puncture. We are studying ultrasound-guided injection as a nonsurgical alternative to sterilization surgery in women and female mammals.

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ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INTRAUTERINE, FALLOPIAN, OR OVARIAN INJECTION FOR NONSURGICAL STERILIZATION, CONTRACEPTION, OR OTHER TREATMENT OF DOGS, HUMANS, AND OTHER MAMMALS

Abstract: Ultrasound can be used to guide an injection into the uterus, uterine horns, fallopian tubes, or ovaries of female mammals, including dogs and humans. Ultrasound-guided intrauterine injectable sterilization / injection / injectable contraception (UG-IUIS / UG-IUI / UGIUIS / UGIIS or UGIIC) can be performed with a number of substances, including calcium chloride solution, alcohol, or a polymer sterilant such as RISUG (“Vasalgel”) or FerroCept. At least in dogs, it is much easier to inject into the lumen of the uterine horns than into the ovaries, which are tough to puncture. We are studying ultrasound-guided injection as a nonsurgical alternative to sterilization surgery in women and female mammals.

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December 19, 2010

This is the story of how our research into whether ultrasound-guided ovarian injection could be used to nonsurgically sterilize female dogs and cats morphed into a related approach-- a “plan B” if you will, but one that we think will work much better: ultrasound-guided uterine injection for sterilization/contraception/treatment of female dogs, cats, and other mammals, including humans.

Since March 2010, Parsemus Foundation has been exploring whether the nonsurgical dog sterilization work using calcium chloride in males can be extended to females.

Dog and cat overpopulation is a problem worldwide, and only the wealthiest communites have been successful in getting ahead of the problem with surgical sterilization (castration for males and ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy for females).

The use of calcium chloride dihydrate in solution with ethyl or isopropyl alcohol or ethanol to sterilize MALE dogs was reported in the literature as far back as 1977/1978 (e.g. Koger LM). An Indian team had been studying the technique (using calcium chloride dihydrate in normal saline) and publishing detailed studies from 1998 to present (Samanta, Jana, et al.).  Based on their studies and the ones before them, calcium chloride injection (in alcohol or saline) appears safe and effective for sterilizing male animals. Parsemus Foundation has been helping these researchers bring their work to a wider audience, including making a video for presentation at the April 8-10, 2010 Alliance for Contraception in Cats and Dogs conference (see “nonsurgical dog sterilization- males” page of www.ParsemusFoundation.org).

If anybody has thought about the idea of using calcium chloride in the ovaries, it has been commonly assumed that it wouldn’t work-- for example, Parsemus Foundation’s medical research director assumed that it would affect nearby organs if used in the ovaries, which are inside the abdominal cavity (unlike in the testes, which are quite separate from the rest of the body), and the Indian team using calcium chloride in males saw little point in trying to inje...