Browse Prior Art Database

PS Server Based Admission Control without eNB Coupling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000202695D
Original Publication Date: 2010-Dec-22
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2010-Dec-22
Document File: 3 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Harris, John: INVENTOR

Abstract

Within wireless communication systems, the application or application server is often aware of information which would have a bearing on admission control (deciding which calls can be carried by the cellular system and which ones should be blocked) decisions. However, the admission control decisions themselves require fairly detailed knowledge of wireless infrastructure information which is not available outside of the cellular infrastructure. Consequently, admission control decisions are generally performed in the cellular infrastructure where more limited application information is available. One approach for addressing this issue is to consider specific techniques for enabling the application server to perform admission control decisions without requiring specific modifications within the wireless cellular infrastructure.

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Server Based Admission Control without eNB Coupling

By John Harris

Motorola Solutions

 

ABSTRACT

Within wireless communication systems, the application or application server is often aware of information which would have a bearing on admission control (deciding which calls can be carried by the cellular system and which ones should be blocked) decisions. However, the admission control decisions themselves require fairly detailed knowledge of wireless infrastructure information which is not available outside of the cellular infrastructure. Consequently, admission control decisions are generally performed in the cellular infrastructure where more limited application information is available. One approach for addressing this issue is to consider specific techniques for enabling the application server to perform admission control decisions without requiring specific modifications within the wireless cellular infrastructure. 

PROBLEM

It is important to perform admission control decisions (deciding which calls can be carried by the cellular system but which ones should be blocked) to avoid poor call quality or dropped calls, e.g. when additional calls handoff mobile stations enter the cell or when some of the mobile stations move farther away from the cellular infrastructure/tower increasing the number of physical resource blocks used per user. In many cases, the application or application server is aware of information which could enhance admission control decisions  However, the admission control decisions themselves require fairly detailed knowledge of wireless infrastructure operating data, and consequently are generally performed in the cellular infrastructure where more limited application information is available. One approach for addressing this issue is to consider specific techniques for enabling the application server to perform admission control decisions without requiring specific modifications within the wireless cellular infrastructure.  Additionally, for some enterprise applications it is likely that all traffic passing over a particular wireless carrier will pass through or be supervised by a single application server. Potential solutions for this problem, as discussed in the next section, can in many cases leverage knowledge of this configuration in the solution design.

SOLUTION

The general approach proposed here is to enable the application server to directly estimate the total amount of wireless traffic passing over the wireless/RF link. A number of specific techniques enable the application server to perform such an estimate.

The application server uses reports from the mobile station’s indicating the amount of radio resources consumed by that user (e.g. physical resource blocks, signal strength, coded bits per information bit). The indication of radio resource usage might take the form of physical resource blocks per application volume transferred. This information combined with the application server’s direct knowledge o...