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VECTOR SIGNAL ANALYZER DISPLAY TRACE SHOWING THE ANTENNA RADIATION PATTERN

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000203769D
Publication Date: 2011-Jan-31

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure relates, in general, to antenna radiation patterns. More specifically the present disclosure is related to a Vector Signal Analyzer (VSA) feature "Antenna Beam Pattern" trace for displaying antenna radiation pattern.

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VECTOR Signal analyzer display trace showing the antenna radiation pattern

Craig Grimley, Yan-Ze Fu, iyappan ramachandran

The present disclosure relates, in general, to antenna radiation patterns. More specifically the present disclosure is related to a Vector Signal Analyzer (VSA) feature “Antenna Beam Pattern” trace for displaying antenna radiation pattern.

Recent years have seen tremendous advancement in the field of communication systems, particularly in the field of mobile communication. Various mobile communication protocols such as GSM (2G), GPRS (2.5G), 3G, 3.9G and 4G, are in active use today. Out of these mobile communication protocols, 3.9G and 4G are the most recent, and 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) network technology is one such 3.9G protocol. Further, 3GPP LTE forms the basis of 3GPP’s proposed LTE-Advanced technology candidate for 4G protocol. An LTE network includes a LTE base station to which one or more users are connected. The LTE base station has plurality of antennas. Using multiple antennas increases the reliability of the network and increases the spatial coverage of the base station. Further, these antennas can be used to steer the signals or radiations in particular directions, based on the location of the users in the cell coverage area. The process of steering the signal in a particular direction is known as beam-steering. Beam steering is accomplished by applying complex weights to each of the antennas. The calculation of complex weights is dependent on the multiple antenna physical geometry configuration employed at the base station transmitter.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an exemplary transmitter 100 including a plurality of antennas 102a, 102b, 102c and 102d. Antennas 102a, 102b, 102c and 102d are physically configured as a linear phased array antenna configuration with each of the four antenna elements equally spaced along a single axis. Antennas 102a, 102b, 102c and 102d are connected to plurality of power amplifiers 104a, 104b, 104c, and 104d respectively. Further, power amplifiers 104a, 104b, 104c, and 104d are connected to plurality of beam-formers 106a, 106b, 106c, and 106d respectively. These Beam-formers 106a, 106b, 106c, and 106d include phase shifters θ1, θ2, θ3, and θ4 respectively. Further, beam-formers 106a, 106b, 106c, and 106d include plurality of magnitude gain block a1, a2, a3, and a4 respectively. Beam-formers 106a, 106b, 106c, and 106d are connected to output of modulator 108 which receives as input an information signal and a carrier signal.

Modulator 108 modulates the carrier signal, based on the information signal, to generate a modulated signal. The modulated signal is applied to beam-formers 106a, 106b, 106c, and 106d. Beam-former 106a receives the modulated signal from modulator 108. In beam-former 106a the magnitude of the modulated signal is scaled by a factor a1. Thereafter, the phase of the modulated signal is shifted by θ1 to generate a weighted modulated signal m1. Th...