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Method for Distributing and Accessing Application Specific Data in Control Centers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000204204D
Original Publication Date: 2011-Feb-18
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2011-Feb-18
Document File: 4 page(s) / 180K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Software which is used for controlling and managing control centers usually stores and maintains data in large, central data storage units. Such data may be engineering data entered by operators in engineering systems, archived field device data, forecast calculations, and other data. This is illustrated in figure 1. These central data storage units consist of several sub-storages containing all data in a well-organized and structured manner. Central storage units have several advantages. For example, all data which is stored is easily accessible by any application which needs to access the data. Figure 2 illustrates applications which need to retrieve data from the Central Data Storage, need to write data on it or may need both. The applications simply connect to the storage and perform certain read or write queries. Applications do not need to distinguish between different server or data storage units, because all data is available within the Central Data Storage. The network architecture is simple and the implementation likewise maintenance efforts are relatively low. Moreover, the licensing costs are also relatively low. Furthermore, when using a Central Data Storage, the backup strategy can be quite simple as only one data storage need to be backed up. It is not necessary that several distributed machines on the network are gathered, backed up and merged. However, a Central Data Storage also has some major drawbacks. For example, if multiple applications attempt to access data in the Central Data Storage simultaneously, the storage may run at very high loads. Thus, responses to each single request may take a long time, respectively may be significantly delayed. Moreover, the attempt to write data simultaneously into the Central Data Storage can also cause locking delays, if the same sections of the data storage are addressed. Therefore, the Central Data Storage needs to ensure that data corruption, caused by written data coming from different applications, is prevented. There are also performance drawbacks due to applications requesting data across the network instead from a local machine.

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Method for Distributing and Accessing Application Specific Data in Control Centers

Idea: Bernd Steiner; DE-N├╝rnberg

Software which is used for controlling and managing control centers usually stores and maintains data in large, central data storage units. Such data may be engineering data entered by operators in engineering systems, archived field device data, forecast calculations, and other data. This is illustrated in figure 1. These central data storage units consist of several sub-storages containing all data in a well-organized and structured manner. Central storage units have several advantages. For example, all data which is stored is easily accessible by any application which needs to access the data. Figure 2 illustrates applications which need to retrieve data from the Central Data Storage, need to write data on it or may need both. The applications simply connect to the storage and perform certain read or write queries. Applications do not need to distinguish between different server or data storage units, because all data is available within the Central Data Storage. The network architecture is simple and the implementation likewise maintenance efforts are relatively low. Moreover, the licensing costs are also relatively low. Furthermore, when using a Central Data Storage, the backup strategy can be quite simple as only one data storage need to be backed up. It is not necessary that several distributed machines on the network are gathered, backed up and merged. However, a Central Data Storage also has some major drawbacks. For example, if multiple applications attempt to access data in the Central Data Storage simultaneously, the storage may run at very high loads. Thus, responses to each single request may take a long time, respectively may be significantly delayed. Moreover, the attempt to write data simultaneously into the Central Data Storage can also cause locking delays, if the same sections of the data storage are addressed. Therefore, the Central Data Storage needs to ensure that data corruption, caused by written data coming from different applications, is prevented. There are also performance drawbacks due to applications requesting data across the network instead from a local machine.

At present, the problem mentioned above is addressed by using high performance data storages, for example Shared Memory Files, instead of using low performance data storages, such as Databases. However, since some applications may require the powerful database built-in SQL (Structured Query Language) command capabilities, this is not possible for every case. Another method is to reduce the number of data accesses by each application. However, this is also a limited approach since accessing data in the Central Storage depends on the requirements of the accessing application. It is also possible to use data storag...