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X-Ray Tomography Device with Embedded Ring-Gap Detectors for Elastically Scattered Radiation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000205714D
Original Publication Date: 2011-Apr-05
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2011-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 191K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

X-ray tomography is based on the display of different attenuation coefficients, which can be used to create 3D (Three-Dimensional) images of the topology of the human body. The quality and accuracy of this reconstruction of the topology depends on various factors as device parameters, operational frequency and retrieval algorithms. However, the resolution of these reconstructed images is generally limited to a finite-sized grid. The finite-sized pieces of such a 3D grid are called voxels. Due to the used mathematic algorithms and the spatial inhomogeneities of the human body, the reconstructed image is not totally accurate in every voxel. Thus, slight changes in the attenuation coefficient of topography features close to each other are very difficult to recognize.

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X-Ray Tomography Device with Embedded Ring-Gap Detectors for Elastically Scattered Radiation

Idea: Miroslav Kocifaj, Ph.D., SK-Bratislava

X-ray tomography is based on the display of different attenuation coefficients, which can be used to create 3D (Three-Dimensional) images of the topology of the human body. The quality and accuracy of this reconstruction of the topology depends on various factors as device parameters, operational frequency and retrieval algorithms. However, the resolution of these reconstructed images is generally limited to a finite-sized grid. The finite-sized pieces of such a 3D grid are called voxels. Due to the used mathematic algorithms and the spatial inhomogeneities of the human body, the reconstructed image is not totally accurate in every voxel. Thus, slight changes in the attenuation coefficient of topography features close to each other are very difficult to recognize.

Attenuation coefficients can be identified by analyzing the intensity difference between the beams before and after passing an object. Tissues, which are irradiated by an electromagnetic beam, also generate so called scattered radiation. This scattering is divided into elastically and inelastically scattered radiation. While the elastical scatter has the same frequency as the incident X-ray and a small scattering angle, the inelastical scatter is incoherent. Moreover, in a tissue like the human body, the scattering angle of inelastical scattering exceeds the scattering angle of elastical scattering.

A novel solution for a more accurate X-ray tomography is presented in the following. It is proposed to use the additional information provided by the elastically scattered radiation generated by the irradiation of the object. The spatial density along the beam trajectory can be identified by analyzing both transferred radiation and elastically scattered...