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Speed up of a fuel processor Start-up Process via a Start Burner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206111D
Publication Date: 2011-Apr-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Start-up of a fuel processing system is accelerated by allowing the front 40% of a reactor bed to reach light off temperature, following which the released best will heat up the rest of the catalyst bed.

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Title:

Speed up of a fuel processor Start-up Process via a Start Burner

Abstract:

Start-up of a fuel processing system is accelerated by allowing the front 40% of a reactor bed to reach light off temperature, following which the released best will heat up the rest of the catalyst bed.

 

Discussion:

For the transportation process involving fuel cells, one needs to heat-up the whole fuel processing system as soon as possible. A current requirement is to be able to start-up within 165 seconds (~100 sec heat up and rest for sequence & permissives).  This target is difficult to meet due to the increase of the WGS catalyst sizes with the start-burner. In addition, to protect the WGS catalyst, one has to set the hot exhaust temperature below 475oC. With this additional limitation, it is almost impossible to heat-up the whole FPS in ~100 seconds. Since the start-up time is one important target, it is necessary to find new alternatives to speed-up the heat-up process.

The current heat-up method is to use a start-up burner to generate hot exhaust gas, feed all the hot gas into the CPO mixer and heat up different units sequentially, i.e., in the order of CPO, VAP310, HTS, VAP340, LTS and finally the PrOx assembly. The problems in the current approach are:

   1). One has to heat-up all the component before heating-up the PrOx assembly, which in fact is not necessary.

  2). Since the PrOx temperature will stay at room temperature in the first ~100 seconds, which is below the dew points of the start-burner exhaust gas. Thus, it is possible to condense the water on a PrOx in the initial 100 seconds, which could potentially damage the PrOx catalyst.

  3). Big pressure drop limits the maximum exhaust gas that can pass through the fuel processing unit, and the current predicted heat-up time can not meet the program target.

To solve above proble...