Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Benzalkonium Chloride as Phase Transfer Catalyst

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206151D
Publication Date: 2011-Apr-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

It is well established that ammonia and amines are useful in capturing carbon dioxide. For example, since the mid to late 1800s in the ammonia soda process, ammonia is added to a solution of sodium chloride in water to increase the amount of carbon dioxide said solution can absorb. Later it was established that amines (such as monoethanol amine) can capture carbon dioxide from gas streams for subsequent recovery of said carbon dioxide. Amines are also indicated as phase transfer catalysts. The technique of this invention discloses that a very small amount of a particular amine, benzalkonium chloride (BAC), has a dramatic effect on the ability of alkaline water based solutions to absorb carbon dioxide gas.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Benzalkonium Chloride as Phase Transfer Catalyst

Abstract

It is well established that ammonia and amines are useful in capturing carbon dioxide. For example, since the mid to late 1800s in the ammonia soda process, ammonia is added to a solution of sodium chloride in water to increase the amount of carbon dioxide said solution can absorb. Later it was established that amines (such as monoethanol amine) can capture carbon dioxide from gas streams for subsequent recovery of said carbon dioxide. Amines are also indicated as phase transfer catalysts.

The technique of this invention discloses that a very small amount of a particular amine, benzalkonium chloride (BAC), has a dramatic effect on the ability of alkaline water based solutions to absorb carbon dioxide gas.

Invention

Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is described as follows in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP):

Benzalkonium chloride (also known as ammonium alkyldimethyl(phenylmethyl)- chloride and alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride) is a mixture of alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chlorides of the general formula:

[C6H5CH2N(CH3)2R]Cl

in which R represents a mixture of alkyls, including all or some of the group beginning with n-C8H17 and extending through higher homologs, with n-C12H25, n-C14H29, and n-C16H33 comprising the major portion. On the anhydrous basis, the content of the n-C12H25 homolog is not less than 40%, and the content of the n-C14H29 homolog is not less than 20% of the total alkylbenzldimethylammonium

chloride content. The total amounts of the n-C12H25 and n-C14H29 homolog components comprise together not less than 70.0 percent of the total alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride content. The total alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride content , calculated on an anhydrous basis, allowance being made for the amount of residue on ignition, is not less than

97.0 percent and not more than 103.0 percent of [C6H5CH2N(CH3)2R]Cl of average molecular weight 360.

BAC is commonly available as 50% solution in water from many sources including among others Lonza Group (sold as Barquat MB-50 and Barquat MB-80), Spectrum Chemical (sold as Benzalkonium chloride), and Universal Preservachem (sold as Benzalkonium chloride). BAC may not however be limited to the general formula given by the USP.

The effect of BAC on the ability of alkaline solutions to absorb carbon dioxide was determined using a nominally 8,000 gallon vessel into which excess alkaline solution of a mixture of HCO3- and C032- ions was fed with sodium ion (i.e. Nat) as the major cationic inorganic species. Spent alkaline solution (i.e. a solution in which a significant amount of

the C032- anion had been converted to HCO3- by reaction with CO2) was removed in sufficient quantity such that excess C032- could be maintained in the reactor. Carbon dioxide was sparged into the reactor at nominally 960 lb/hour using a vortex meter on the feed to determine feed rate and a turbine meter on the reactor vent to measure vent...