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Method of Creating Task Cards with Complete Life Cycle Information

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206418D
Publication Date: 2011-Apr-25
Document File: 5 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method of creating task cards with complete life cycle information is disclosed. The method allows creating task cards with tasks that may be assigned to others or may be tasks assigned by others. The task cards keep track of updates and the current state of the task. The task cards also supply actions needed throughout the task's life cycle.

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Method of Creating Task Cards with Complete Life Cycle Information

Disclosed is a method of creating task cards with complete life cycle information. The method disclosed herein allows creating task cards with tasks that may be assigned to others or may be tasks assigned by others. A task card is a free floating dialog that presents users with information associated with a task. For example, a task card provides information needed for working on tasks and is similar to a sticky note.

The task cards keep track of updates and the current state of the task. Further, the task cards supply actions needed throughout the task's life cycle. The task's life cycle begins with accepting a task and ends with the completion of the task. During the task's life cycle, the task may be modified in multiple ways, including but not limited to, changing due dates, priorities, status updates, start dates, and assignees. Additionally, the method also allows the task card to be compacted, thus enabling hiding information of lower priority. A task may be an assignee task or an owner task. An assignee task is a task that is assigned by others. An owner task is a task that is to be assigned to others.

Fig. 1 to Fig. 3 exemplarily illustrates task cards representing an assignee task. The task cards are owned by a user "Robert". The tasks are assigned to another user, "Anders". The user, "Anders", accepts the task, updates the task cards with comments if need be, and then completes the task. The task card is simultaneously updated. Fig. 4 exemplarily illustrates a compacted task card corresponding to the abo...