Browse Prior Art Database

Composite web widget building via a user interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206514D
Publication Date: 2011-Apr-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to, within User Interface (UI) engines such as portals and mash-ups, take advantage of z-order overlapped rendering to build composite widgets. Resulting composite widgets are easily reused for future applications or used as building blocks for more complex widgets.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

Composite web widget building via a user interface

Innovation in widgets in general and web widgets in particular come from new ways of assembling some basic User Interface (UI) building blocks. Most require some form of input (e.g., via text fields, drop down selectors, etc.) from the user or the external environment (Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX) calls, Universal Resource Locator (URL) request parameters, backend Application Programming Interfaces (APIs)), such as status from a monitored server. The widget then processes the given data and renders it on screen, adding value either in the presentation of existing data (e.g., pie chart, or bar graph) or upon further processing of the data (calculating averages or trend lines). The ability to quickly build composite web widgets to perform more complex processing and rendering from these individual loose widgets without developing new, original code, accelerates the delivery of value. Also, empowering everyday users to snap these controls in place to make a reusable uber-widget without programming lowers the skill level needed and harnesses the creativity of all users who can better serve themselves.

Mash-up technologies help with the self-service aspect to some extent, but the resulting mash-up is not easy to re-use. Also mash-ups solve complete end-to-end flows and do not necessarily produce a final widget. Other existing solutions for composite widget building are programmatic, where a developer must implement new code to stitch together a combination of existing widgets from a library.

The disclosed solution is a method to, within UI engines such as portals and mash-ups, take advantage of z-order overlapped rendering to build composite widgets. A user is presented with a palette of atomic UI elements. These elements could include input widgets such as text fields and drop-down selectors or output widgets such as visual status indicators. It could include...