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Quick Connections to Visual Engineering Environment (VEE) Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206697D
Publication Date: 2011-May-02
Document File: 8 page(s) / 146K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The VEE graphical language environment provides a quick path to measurement and analysis and allows seamless operation with hardware and software in an object-based platform.

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Quick Connections to Visual Engineering Environment (VEE) Objects

 

Shawn Lam

Background

The VEE graphical language environment provides a quick path to measurement and analysis and allows seamless operation with hardware and software in an object-based platform.  A VEE program consists of multiple connected VEE objects, which are also referred to as devices. Each VEE object consists of different types of terminals, such as data terminals, sequence terminals, execute terminals (XEQ), control terminals and error terminals. Data terminals govern the data flow propagation while sequence terminals determine object execution order.  The terminals are also referred to as “hotpoints.”

Fig. 1 illustrates a first object 101 and a second object 102 of a VEE display.

The terminals on the right side of an object (e.g., terminal 103 of first object 101) are called output terminals, and the terminals on the left side of the object are input terminals (e.g., terminal 104 of first object 102). Two objects A and B are connected if the output terminal of Object A is connected to Object B’s input terminal. So, in Fig. 1 first object 101 is connected to second object 102 through a connection line 105 between terminal 103 and terminal 104. Several connection lines can emanate from a single output terminal, but at most one connection line can be attached to an input terminal. All data input terminals and execute terminals must be connected, whereas control terminals and output terminals can be left unconnected.

The terminals on the top and bottom of the object are referred to as sequence terminals. So, for example, in Fig. 1, terminals 106 are on the top of first and second objects 101, 102 and terminals 107 are on the bottom of first and second objects 102.  A connection line (not shown) between bottom terminal 106 of first object 101 to the top terminal 107 of the second object 102 results in the execution of the function of the first object 101 followed by the execution of the function of the second object 102.

There are certain limitations of connecting objects in the current VEE platform, which is often shared with other visual programming environments. For example, the user must specifically connect the output terminal of one object with the input terminal of another object. In a complex application, the objects to be linked by line may be displayed on different screens.  So, the objects may be quite far apart. As a result in order to effect the connection between the output terminal of the first object to the input terminal of the second object, the user may need to move their pointing device (e.g., mouse) a comparatively long while ensuring they do not mistakenly click on a terminal of another (unintended) object.  This can be a cumbersome operation and errors can occur.

Furthermore, in some cases the user will need to connect one terminal of one object with a number of terminals of another object or a plurality of objects. In current VEE platf...