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DRIVER CONTROLLED VEHICLE AUTOMATION RELATING TO ACTIVATION OF AUXILIARY SYSTEMS AND TO CRUISE CONTROL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206735D
Publication Date: 2011-May-05
Document File: 8 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present invention provides a system which utilizes the knowledge of an experience driver of a vehicle. The driver can here influence when auxiliary systems are to be activated in the vehicle. Also, the driver can influence the function of a cruise control system regulating the velocity variation of the vehicle. The driver influence is achieved by utilization of an input arrangement. By the present invention, the driver can e.g. utilize his knowledge of the topography of the road ahead and his experience of he vehicle behavior due to the topography, such that an excess of energy being present in a downhill slope can be utilized by the auxiliary systems, whereby the auxiliary systems can be driven partly “for free”. Also, the driver can instruct the cruise control system to allow a decrease in speed before a downhill slope, since the vehicle will accelerate anyway in the downhill slope. The driver can also instruct the auxiliary systems not to consume valuable energy before and/or during uphill slopes. Thus, the driver can control the vehicle to follow the principles of “heavy eco driving” in a way that resembles a manual Look Ahead cruise control. The present invention offers a fuel efficient and less expensive alternative to more fully automated vehicle systems. Also, the present invention offers an increased feeling of control for the driver.

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driver controlled vehicle automation relating to activation of auxiliary systems and to cruise control

Abstract

The present invention provides a system which utilizes the knowledge of an experience driver of a vehicle. The driver can here influence when auxiliary systems are to be activated in the vehicle. Also, the driver can influence the function of a cruise control system regulating the velocity variation of the vehicle. The driver influence is achieved by utilization of an input arrangement. By the present invention, the driver can e.g. utilize his knowledge of the topography of the road ahead and his experience of he vehicle behavior due to the topography, such that an excess of energy being present in a downhill slope can be utilized by the auxiliary systems, whereby the auxiliary systems can be driven partly “for free”. Also, the driver can instruct the cruise control system to allow a decrease in speed before a downhill slope, since the vehicle will accelerate anyway in the downhill slope. The driver can also instruct the auxiliary systems not to consume valuable energy before and/or during uphill slopes. Thus, the driver can control the vehicle to follow the principles of “heavy eco driving” in a way that resembles a manual Look Ahead cruise control. The present invention offers a fuel efficient and less expensive alternative to more fully automated vehicle systems. Also, the present invention offers an increased feeling of control for the driver.

Description

In systems being developed for vehicles today, and especially for heavy vehicles such as trucks and busses, more and more of the functions are being automated. One reason for this development is that the vehicles are getting more and more complex, including use of a large number of processors for controlling a large number of functions of the vehicle. The idea behind this trend towards automated systems is that a driver of such a complex vehicle should be able to rely on that the vehicle helps him to make the right decisions, or makes the right decision for him, when driving the vehicle. The driver can then focus on driving the vehicle in a safe and comfortable manner.

Generally, these automated systems are a great help for drivers of these complex vehicles, especially for more inexperienced drivers. More experienced drivers, however, who presumably have a very good knowledge of the vehicle itself as well as of the results of a certain driving behavior, might find themselves deprived of the control of the vehicle by the automated systems. For example, an experienced driver might have a very well established feeling for how to drive a vehicle in an economic way regarding fuel consumption. For example, an experienced driver can utilize the topography of the road ahead of him to lower the fuel consumption, by taking advantage of acceleration of the vehicle due to gravity in downhill slopes (in line with the teachings of “heavy eco driving”). Therefore, an experienced d...