Browse Prior Art Database

GESTURE-BASED METHOD FOR USER IDENTIFICATION TO ADVANCED TELEVISION VIEWING PLATFORMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000206947D
Publication Date: 2011-May-13
Document File: 6 page(s) / 135K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 24% of the total text.

Page 01 of 6

(This page contains 00 pictures or other non-text object)

 

(This page contains 02 pictures or other non-text object)

G E S T U R E ‐ B A S E D   M E T H O D   F O R   U S E R   I D E N T I F I C A T I O N   T O   A D V A N C E D   T E L E V I S I O N   V I E W I N G   P L A T F O R M S  


(This page contains 03 pictures or other non-text object)

Author: Slade Mitchell

Currently, the television viewer experience is anonymous.  It is not necessary to 'login' to a  television to interact with the services a viewer is entitled to.  By extension, this means that  television viewers do not need to consider or even comprehend scenarios like login, log out, or  changing users, setting or resetting passwords.  Software implementers also do not have to worry  about these scenarios, nor use case distinctions between logged‐in sessions versus anonymous  sessions. 

 

As the television viewing experience begins to include more internet‐like features it is becoming  increasingly useful to know the identity of the viewer(s) interacting with the television delivery  device (STB, PC, mobile, etc).  The traditional television interaction, however, is via a handheld  remote control that does not lend itself to traditional login user scenarios due to its lack of numeric  keys, etc. 

 

Although the concept of logging viewers into content delivery devices or systems has been  investigated by vendors and environments, it is not in use today in any mainstream device, e.g.,   STB stack.  Variations for user identification and authentication might include:   

  

Implementing a user interface (UI) element to enter a mode where the user login can be 

managed. 

A UI that lists existing known users by some username or friendly name and lets the user 

select a user to log in. 

Allowing a user to enter a T9 version of their username and/or alphanumeric password, or 

accepting a numeric personal identification number (PIN) as the password. 

Populating the remote control with buttons that can be tied to specific user identities.  This  provides identity, but not authentication so it is still necessary to display a PIN entry.  

 

P a g e | 1 1701 John F. Kennedy Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19103

(This page contains 01 pictures or other non-text object)


Page 02 of 6

(This page contains 00 pictures or other non-text object)

 

There are several drawbacks with the above‐described approaches: 

Users must proactively enter a mode where a user login or management can be performed.   This would need to be a low‐level feature available from everywhere, which means 

consuming UI real estate or introducing a specific ...