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A Method for Integrated Circuit on Chip Temperature Detection with Low Power Supply Sensitivity

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000207264D
Publication Date: 2011-May-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for integrated circuit on-chip temperature detection with low power supply sensitivity. The design utilizes a temperature sensor that is more sensitive to changes in temperature than it is to anticipated fluctuations in power supply voltage. The sensor provides more accurate temperature measurement and a more efficient method to dissipate heat through hot spots on the chip.

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A Method for Integrated Circuit on Chip Temperature Detection with Low Power Supply Sensitivity

As operating frequencies of high-performance central processing units (CPUs) increase, efficient methods of heat dissipation and temperature management become increasingly important design considerations. Excessive ambient temperature can degrade circuit performance or in some cases destroy hardware. Typically, heat dissipation is improved by heat sinking, forced air cooling, water cooling, or in some cases with a refrigerant. These approaches can increase unit expense, equipment size, and equipment weight, require water supply/drainage connections, or require the use a compressor as part of the cooling system. On-chip temperature sensors can be used to reduce the amount of heat generated by the CPU by actuating a reduced clock speed. As clock speed is reduced, heat dissipation can be managed when short-term processor performance degradation is tolerable.

For the disclosed invention, the design criterion requires a temperature sensor that is more sensitive to changes in temperature than it is to anticipated fluctuations in power supply voltage. Because the area of the temperature sensor is comparatively small, these sensors will then be placed in "hot spots" on the chip.

As shown below (Figure 1), the temperature sensor consists of a single input pin, a single output pin, and three internal functional blocks. The iddq input pin is used to activate c

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oscillator. The psro output pin provides an output signal with a temperature-dependent frequency that is decreased as temperature is increased.

The c

          iref circuit block (Figure 1) creates output reference currents i0 and i1 that are injected into nodes i0 and i1 of the c

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As shown below in c

                   lg (Figure 2), reference gate voltages are produced at nodes i0 and i1 in order to mirror the current from c

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lg. Since local ground (lg) is referenced

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_rlf ring

_iref and c

_lg while initializing the c

_

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                                  lg circuit block. These refere...