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Method for Predicting Finishing Performance of Xerographic Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000208100D
Publication Date: 2011-Jun-23
Document File: 7 page(s) / 352K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This idea discloses a test method that has been developed to predict the behavior of xerographic prints in finishing operations including lamination and bookbinding. Xerographic digital presses are used for production of publications, such as books-on-demand, brochures, and manuals. Many such applications also include a finishing operation, such as bookbinding, by applying a hot melt adhesive. Issues with poor adhesion are often encountered for the xerographic prints due to the presence of significant fuser oil contamination that is a side effect of the print process. There are variations in performance with combinations of different media and fuser oil types. This method predicts general adhesion properties of a print. It has been found that testing the specific media and fuser oil, using the proposed test method, will provide reliable data about anticipated finishing performance. The method involves precise quantitative determination of the amount of residual fuser fluid remaining on the surface of a print on a particular media from a particular xerographic press. This method could be a valuable tool for qualifying media acceptable to binding, and also to hot melt glue/adhesive manufacture’s in developing new adhesives compatible with the resulting prints. It could also be useful to silicone oil manufacturers in the development of new fuser release agents that would produce prints with fewer finishing issues.

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Method for Predicting Finishing Performance of Xerographic Printers

This idea discloses a test method that has been developed to predict the behavior of xerographic prints in finishing operations including lamination and bookbinding.  Xerographic digital presses are used for production of publications, such as books-on-demand, brochures, and manuals.  Many such applications also include a finishing operation, such as bookbinding, by applying a hot melt adhesive.  Issues with poor adhesion are often encountered for the xerographic prints due to the presence of significant fuser oil contamination that is a side effect of the print process.  There are variations in performance with combinations of different media and fuser oil types.  This method predicts general adhesion properties of a print. It has been found that testing the specific media and fuser oil, using the proposed test method, will provide reliable data about anticipated finishing performance.  The method involves precise quantitative determination of the amount of residual fuser fluid remaining on the surface of a print on a particular media from a particular xerographic press.  This method could be a valuable tool for qualifying media acceptable to binding, and also to hot melt glue/adhesive manufacture’s in developing new adhesives compatible with the resulting prints.  It could also be useful to silicone oil manufacturers in the development of new fuser release agents that would produce prints with fewer finishing issues.

Introduction:

Xerographic prints unavoidably contain residual fuser oil on the surface. The trace amount of fuser oil can significantly lower the surface free energy of the prints, thus causing poor adhesion on the bonded article. For example, the surface free energy (SFE) of the xerographic prints, as estimated by using Lewis

Acid-Base Method, ranges from 10 ~ 25 mN/m for most media. Most commercially available hot melt adhesives, however, work only for a substrate with an SFE higher than 30 mN/m. The proposed method is valuable to be able to measure and predict system behavior.

Reduction to Practice:

1: Gluability (fiber tear) Test Procedure:

Gluability, or the percentage of fiber tear, is tested by using the gluability tester. It is composed of two parts - draw down coater and laminator. The coater plate is separated into two parts. Only the top part heats to the glue application temperature. The bottom part is kept cold. This is to simulate the binding machine application.

A piece of film with size 4.25” x 7” (same size as the top part of the plate) was put on the top plate and the adhesive was put on the film. One distinguished advantage of this fixture is that the adhesive can be switched from one to the other within 2 minutes, while a commercially available hot melt adhesive gluability tester such as Waldorf will need at least two to three hours. The film is disposable and the draw down Meyer rod can be cleaned by paper towel. This gluabili...