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Strategy, high level process, and governance for staged a sustainable implementation of the Application Portfolio Management (APM) discipline

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000209846D
Publication Date: 2011-Aug-17
Document File: 4 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a framework containing a strategy, a high level process, high level process and governance method for a staged sustainable implementation of the Application Portfolio Management (APM) discipline. The disclosed invention breaks APM implementation and institutionalization into three (3) well defined cycles, each with specific objectives and planning horizons.

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Strategy, high level process, and governance for staged a sustainable implementation of the Application Portfolio Management (APM) discipline

The Application Portfolio Management (APM) discipline is gaining momentum as the key element of IT governance and main driver of modernizing legacy applications. Unfortunately, many organizations are unsuccessful in the implementation and institutionalization of the APM discipline because they are trying to implement too much at the same time without giving sufficient thought to the costs involved and benefits to be realized. It also makes APM difficult to tailor to the organization needs.

The existing approaches to solve these problems typically involve dividing APM by applications in scope. This leads to misleading results because the sub-portfolio in scope does not represent the true application landscape. As a result, organizations are being discouraged by lack of meaningful results and/or misleading application decisions.

Because of these difficulties, the industry analysts (e.g., Gartner, Forrester) are quoting the APM discipline as one of the most immature (1.46 on a 1 to 5 scale).

The disclosed invention breaks APM implementation and institutionalization into three


(3) well defined cycles aligned with the planning horizon with very specific objectives, scope, and stakeholders. It also defines the critical ongoing underlying activities to:


1. Build and maintain APM momentum,


2. Keep APM related information up to date, and


3. Report the APM results.

At the same time, it outlines in detail APM governance and defines the key APM related roles and responsibilities.

By following this framework, organizations can create a sustainable implementation of APM in a progressive, simple, and manageable way; therefore, they can more quickly realize the benefits of APM. Because this invention engages the APM stakeholders in a progressive way, it minimizes the potential disruption, proves the value of APM faster, and increases the support of the stakeholders.

The APM key and underlying cycles (key cycles marked in bold) include: (Figure 1)


• Preparation (ongoing): Creates and keeps APM momentum going. It defines overall governance, develops application portfolio lifecycle strategy, creates and maintains required infrastructure, and provides initial and ongoing education, guidance and mentoring.


Categorization (operational): Focuses day-to-day application maintenance and support activities and associated resources where required on high value/high impact applications, and reduces on low value/low impact applications. It establishes application measurements to quantify their contribution and to adjust service levels accordingly.


Technology Rationalization (tactical): Reduces application risk caused by deteriorating quality, aging technology, and increasing consumption of

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resources. It establishes application measurements to identify weaknesses and anomalies, and to address the...