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Alarm Log with Universally Unique ID

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000211424D
Original Publication Date: 2011-Oct-05
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2011-Oct-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

In a wind turbine, the condition of all vital components is continuously monitored by the turbine’s control computer. If an abnormal situation rises, an alarm is generated and communicated to one or more client computers for initiation of proper corrective actions, e.g. replacement of mechanical parts. Alarm information typically consists of an indication of the component, an indication of the nature of the failure, and a timestamp, giving the point in time when the failure occurred.

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Alarm Log with Universally Unique ID

Idea: Hans Kruckenberg, DK-Brande

In a wind turbine, the condition of all vital components is continuously monitored by the turbine's control computer. If an abnormal situation rises, an alarm is generated and communicated to one or more client computers for initiation of proper corrective actions, e.g. replacement of mechanical parts. Alarm information typically consists of an indication of the component, an indication of the nature of the failure, and a timestamp, giving the point in time when the failure occurred.

To ensure that no alarm is lost during a communication link interruption, alarms are stored in a persisted data log residing in the turbine and fetched from this log by the client(s). If the communication is interrupted, alarm transfer is just postponed until the communication has been re- established. This way, alarm information will not be lost as a result of the interruption. Its communication will just be delayed (see Figure 1).

However, problems rise, if the persisted log is replaced during the communication link interruption either due to replacement of the whole turbine computer holding the log or due to a replacement or reformat of the log itself. The client has no straightforward way of knowing that the log has been replaced. This may have serious consequences in the following two cases:

A) If a replacement is overlooked by the client and the number of entries in the new log is equal to or greater than the number of entries in the old one prior to interruption, the client would assume that no or a too small number of new entries have been appended to the log during the interruption. This leads to loss of all or some of the alarms emerged during the time period from replacement until communication re-establishment.

B) If a replacement is falsely assumed by the client, alarms already communicated may be re- transmitted, leading to alarm duplication.

If the client monitors a unique signature for the current turbine computer, e.g. its network card MAC- address (MAC: Media Access Control), it will be able to detect a turbine computer replacement correctly. But this procedure will not be able detect a replacement or a reformat of the log. The client may monitor the number of entries in the log and tr...