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Calculating Anticipated Interpersonal Event Value by Analyzing Participant Expertise and Expectations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000212801D
Publication Date: 2011-Nov-28
Document File: 6 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method to allow allows all parties involved in a learning event to examine in a rigorous way, prior to the event, the proposed content, the anticipated content, and realms of expertise of both parties. The invention uses access to 'knowledge maps from the cloud', numerical representation, scoring techniques, and graphical depiction approaches to convey to all parties elements of the planned learning event. Upon analysis, presenters and attendees can determine the expected success of the event and make any necessary changes.

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Calculating Anticipated Interpersonal Event Value by Analyzing Participant Expertise and Expectations

In planned learning events (i.e., all type of planned educational events such as classes, seminars, webcasts, etc.) there is currently no way to systematically compare and analyze a number of areas of concern:


a) Content to be presented


b) Presenter's area of expertise


c) Attendees' realm of knowledge


d) Attendees' expectation of learning goals


e) Overall contextual analysis of a-d

Lack of this capability leads to problems such as mismatches in the realms defined above. As a result of such mismatches, attendees can be disappointed by presentation content, scope, etc. In addition, both presenters and attendees can arrive ill-prepared to a learning event. This situation leads to the potential for each actor to fail in meeting his/her objectives regarding the learning content.

Specifically, there is no process, system, or solution to enable these learning event actors to provide, map, and correlate presentation content and the various knowledge realms associated with each actor. Nor is there any facility to provide these actors with a depiction of how well these realms match, well in advance of the learning event.

This invention provides a solution to the above problem for both presenters and consumers of information (i.e., learners) in the context of learning events. It allows all parties to examine in a rigorous way - before an event occurs - the proposed content, the anticipated content, and realms of expertise of both parties. It also provides visual depictions of how well those realms coincide and in what specific areas.

The invention uses access to 'knowledge maps from the cloud', numerical representation, scoring techniques, and graphical depiction approaches to convey to all parties:


• Knowledge realm of the proposed presentation content


• Knowledge realm (expertise) of the presenter


• Presumed expertise of the audience


• Audience's anticipated/desired areas of learning, subsequent to attending the event


• Overall contextual analysis of a-d

By strictly defining the unstructured problem contexts, examiners can analyze and correlate information into visual representations which allow people/audience/problem definer (in this example this is depicted as a presenter) to make anticipatory adjustments as needed. In this case, by providing this capability the invention allows all parties involved to better prepare, anticipate objections, modify content, etc., before events take place, thereby making those events more valuable.

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The invention operates as follows:


First, all parties - presenter(s) and attendee(s) - must represent their respective areas of expertise in a standard form that can be consumed and exchanged. It would be valuable for that information to be depicted in a standard 'knowledge representation' scheme. Several proposed standards for such knowledge representation schemes exist today.

Knowled...