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Hearing Instrument with External Microphone and Receiver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000213393D
Original Publication Date: 2011-Dec-13
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2011-Dec-13
Document File: 1 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Hearing aids are accepted on the market and within society as a standard method for dealing with sensorineural hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss can not be fixed with medicine or surgery, and that is when people become candidates for hearing aids. Despite the common acceptance of hearing aids, current hearing aid users still report some issues with even the most advanced hearing devices. These issues include feedback, wind noise and cosmetics. Feedback is a "whistling" sound that occurs when amplified sound from the receiver finds its way back to the microphones and gets amplified again. Wind noise occurs when there is too much air or wind blowing across the microphones; the microphones may become saturated such that nothing else can be heard.

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Hearing Instrument with External Microphone and Receiver

Idea: Lennell Dyonna Jackson, SG-Singapore; Leong Chye Kenneth Ler, SG-Singapore; Chor Hua
Kuek, SG-Singapore; Swee Lian Fiona Boey, SG-Singapore; Hui Ching Jane Koh, SG- Singapore; Lai Ting Leong, SG-Singapore; Han Ern Ong, SG-Singapore

Hearing aids are accepted on the market and within society as a standard method for dealing with sensorineural hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss can not be fixed with medicine or surgery, and that is when people become candidates for hearing aids. Despite the common acceptance of hearing aids, current hearing aid users still report some issues with even the most advanced hearing devices. These issues include feedback, wind noise and cosmetics. Feedback is a "whistling" sound that occurs when amplified sound from the receiver finds its way back to the microphones and gets amplified again. Wind noise occurs when there is too much air or wind blowing across the microphones; the microphones may become saturated such that nothing else can be heard.

Current advanced hearing aid technology uses several methods for addressing feedback, wind noise and cosmetics. Feedback and wind noise are often addressed by microphone position on the device itself as well as algorithms within the hearing instrument. In addition, feedback is also sometimes addressed by changing the position of the receiver and removing it from the housing of the hearing instrument. Cosmetics and stigma are usually addressed by attempts to make tubing less visible and/or attempts to make the housing smaller. In some cases, the housing has been made smaller by removing the receiver from the housing and placing it in the ear canal. This has the added benefit of also aiding with feedback because removing the receiver from the housing also moves the receiver further away from the microphones. In some cases, the housing has been made smaller by removing the microphone from the housing and placing it in the concha. This has the added benefit of also aiding with wind noise.

The problems still to be solved are hearing loss, feedback, wind noise, and cosmetics. The novel idea lies in removing both the microphone and the receiver from the housing of the hearing aid. The based unit is placed in the con...