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System for detailed process instructing, controlling and tracking

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000213469D
Publication Date: 2011-Dec-15
Document File: 5 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is process-control software that uses golden lines to indicate progression and offer instruction through a process. Golden lines shown on an application’s user interface offer simple and easy process instructions that are not possible to view with a multiple-page flow chart.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 39% of the total text.

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System for detailed process instructing , controlling and tracking

Many companies and organizations follow, teach, and inspect thousands of processes. Employees are specialized in specific processes; often, they cannot work on different activities other than their own, even if they have training for other activities, due to policies or procedures.

The most common tools used for process control are flowcharts, desk level procedures, or manuals for equipment usage. Databases keep track of processes and supervisors go through samples of process documentation in order to find defects.

The problem is that business operation process documentation only includes a mid-level procedure, but often desk level procedures include details that create barriers to knowledge sharing and process compliance. Furthermore, teaching a process is time consuming and generates expenses. Also, learning curves have a strong impact in an employee's performance and process compliance.

In addition, activities that involve complex processes, such as equipment usage, can lead to misuse and losses, not only for the company, but also for the end user who will not always remember every detail of operating a product (e.g., a camera, setting up computer parts in a rack, etc.).

Another common problem is that it is hard to distribute work among specialized employees, regardless of how much training they have to ensure they know other processes other than their own. This happens because if an employee is used to working on a single process for a long period of time and after that period has free time to work on another process, this employee will not remember operational details of this other process. Besides, even if they do remember, process changes can prevent this employee from performing another process.

The disclosed solution is process-control software that uses golden lines to indicate progression and offer instruction through a process. Golden lines shown on an application's user interface offer simple and easy process instructions that are not possible to view with a multiple-page flow chart. The golden line tool shows a simple line with every step of a process. Red circles within the line represent each action within the process.

It is fast for experienced processors while containing enough details for new processors. Traditional methods of flow charts or desk level procedures are long and confusing; golden lines use little visual space.

The characteristics and uses for the golden lines on a user interface while working through a process include:


• Can be moved anywhere on the screen to assist while the processing takes place; whereas, procedures and flow charts take up a lot of the user's visual space and require the interchange of screens, which gets in the way of processing screens and may confuse a processor.

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• Show the user a single line to indicate the process to follow; whereas, flowcharts take the user through a myriad of lines and...