Browse Prior Art Database

Neuromodulation Therapy for Cluster Headaches

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000214367D
Publication Date: 2012-Jan-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TAC) are a group of primary neurovascular headaches. Cluster headache is a type of TAC that is characterized by severe unilateral pain localized orbitally, suprabitally, or temporally. The cluster headache is a unique clinical and epidemiological entity. Formerly classified as a vascular migraine variant, cluster headache is thought to be one of the most severe headache syndromes. It is characterized by attacks of severe pain, generally unilateral and orbital and lasting 15 minutes to 3 hours, with one or more symptoms such as ptosis, miosis, unilateral rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, lacrimation, and conjunctival injection.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 41% of the total text.

Neuromodulation Therapy for Cluster Headaches

BACKGROUND:

Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TAC) are a group of primary neurovascular headaches. Cluster headache is a type of TAC that is characterized by severe unilateral pain localized orbitally, suprabitally, or temporally.  The cluster headache is a unique clinical and epidemiological entity. Formerly classified as a vascular migraine variant, cluster headache is thought to be one of the most severe headache syndromes. It is characterized by attacks of severe pain, generally unilateral and orbital and lasting 15 minutes to 3 hours, with one or more symptoms such as ptosis, miosis, unilateral rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, lacrimation, and conjunctival injection.

In most patients, headaches occur in episodes, generally with a regular time pattern. These "cluster periods" last for weeks to months, separated by periods of remission lasting months to years. These headaches primarily affect men and in many cases patients having distinguishing facial, body, and psychological features. Several factors may precipitate cluster headaches, including histamine, nitroglycerin, alcohol, and transition from rapid eye movement (REM) to non-REM sleep, circadian periodicity, environmental alterations, and change in the level of physical, emotional, or mental activity.

Moreover, cluster headache attacks typically occur with circadian rhythmicity where patients often report experiencing attacks at fixed times of the day or night. Cluster headaches can take on a more episodic form or a chronic form. In the episodic form, the headaches occur every day for several weeks/months ('clusters'), followed by a period of remission. Conversely, in the chronic form, the attacks occur daily without significant periods of remission.

The estimated prevalence of cluster headache is 69 cases per 100,000 people. Men are affected more commonly than women in a proportion of 6:1. Although most patients begin experiencing headache between the ages of 20 and 50 years (mean of 30 years), the syndrome may begin as early as the first decade and as late as the eighth decade.

DESCRIPTION:

Patients with cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgies can utilize safe and effective neurostimulation therapy with a stimulation platform centralized around multiple current sources, rechargeable battery technology, and multi-port implantable pulse generators.

Subcutaneous placement of leads near the supraorbital nerves has also been shown to be a safe and effective neurostimulation implantation technique for treating cluster headache. For treating headaches and chronic pain, the peripheral nerve stimulator (PNS) can be implanted in the vicinity of the supraorbital nerve, a frontal branch of the trigeminal nerve, in the forehead region.

The present idea relates to treating cluster headaches or other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgies with a combination of peripheral and cervical electrical nerve stimulation. Percutaneous or paddle...