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Method to Validate Location of IT Assets in Configuration Management Database for Data Center Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000214906D
Publication Date: 2012-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to validate the location of IT assets in a configuration management database for data center management. The method leverages an IP subnet address database to determine the current location of a desktop user in their "Map" applications. Both public and Internet Service Providers contribute to the database, providing a reference standard for a given IP address.

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Method to Validate Location of IT Assets in Configuration Management Database for Data Center Management

Business Analytics for cost and quality improvements, increased customer satisfaction, and improving sales is an important part of the strategy for the IT Services companies. An accurate inventory of IT assets is the key element for such analytics. However, due to the manual aspects of entering inventory data into the various configuration management databases (CMDBs), the process is prone to errors and the resulting low data quality renders analytics ineffective. Even in the cases where there are automatic discovery based tools deployed with CMDBs, the location information is entered manually. The manual data entries adversely affect the data quality.

Geolocation Technology enables users to automatically get the location of an asset by using the Internet Protocol (IP) address of the machines. Internet and computer geolocation can be performed by associating a geographic location with the IP address, MAC address, radio frequency identification (RFID), hardware embedded article/production number, embedded software number, invoice, wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi) connection location, or device global positioning system (GPS) coordinates, or other, perhaps self-disclosed information. Geolocation usually works by automatically looking up an IP address and retrieving the registrant's physical address.

The method disclosed here leverages an IP subnet address database to determine the current location of a desktop user in their "Map" applications. Both public and Internet Service Providers contribute to the database, providing a reference standard for a given IP address.

There are a number of free and paid subscription geolocation databases, ranging from country to state or city levels (including ZIP/post code levels), each with varying claims of accuracy (generally higher at the country level). These databases typically contain IP address data for use in firewalls, ad servers, routing, mail systems, websites, and other automated systems where geolocation may be useful. An alternative to hosting and querying a database is to obtain the country code for a given IP address through a Domain Name Service-based Block List (DNSBL)-style lookup from a remote server.

A number of geolocation Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are available to query the geolocation database. The idea here i...