Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Slidable Dock for Input Device on Mobile Handset

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000215132D
Publication Date: 2012-Feb-21
Document File: 4 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This article describes of putting the devices(including buttons, scroll ball or cameras) on a slide bar on mobile handsets so that users may move the device along the slide bar to the most convenient location. Currently, the locations of input device, for example: buttons, scroll ball or cameras, are fixed on the panel of a mobile handset, for example: PDA or cell phone. Some times this is not convenient for special users, for examples: left-handed person or person with short fingers. This invention desclosure solves this kind of problem.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 82% of the total text.

Page 01 of 4

Slidable Dock for Input Device on Mobile Handset

Disclosed is a method to enable users to move the devices to their preferred locations on mobile handset, for example, user can move the camera lens from left-top corner to the right-top corner of the cell phone, as shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1: Moving the camera lens from left to right

At present, most mobile handsets (PDA or cell phone) have location-fixed input devices, including buttons, scroll balls and camera lens. All of the design are for the convenience of commonusers. But for those special users, for example: left-handed users, users

with short fingers, etc, the locations of the input device may be very inconvenient.

Take the camera lens on a cell phone for example, Figure 2 shows a cell phone with a camera lens on the left-top corner of its back face . It is convenient for common right handed users to hold the device without obscuring the camera lens .

1


Page 02 of 4

Figure 2: A right handed user holds the device

However, when a left handed user holds the device, the camera is very likely to be obscured by the index finger, as shown in Figure 3.

2


Page 03 of 4

Figure 3: A left handed user holds the device

The disclosed method putts the camera lens on a slide bar, as shown on Figure 4, users may move the lens along the slide bar and put it on the preferred location:

3


Page 04 of 4

Figure 4: Putting the camera lens on a slide bar


The slide bar can be a straight line, arc, rectangle or circle, as show...