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LOOPED VIDEO TECHNIQUES FOR VIDEO CONFERENCE SUBMEETINGS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000216757D
Publication Date: 2012-Apr-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

David Putterman: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Existing video chat based products enable participants to engage in video conferencing over remote distances. One of the problems facing people in these meetings is that they are constantly viewed by other participants in the video conference. There is no mechanism for a conference participant to conduct a side conversation or quickly refer to prepared documents without being seen by other participants without shutting off their video feed. Shutting off the video mid-meeting and turning it back on makes it obvious that an individual is not in front of the screen. This can be disruptive or counter productive to the video conference. A solution is provided that allows a user to press a button to loop video of themselves to other participants in the video conference. This enables a user to talk with others in the room while other participants view the looped video.

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LOOPED VIDEO TECHNIQUES FOR VIDEO CONFERENCE SUBMEETINGS

AUTHORS:

David Putterman

John Russell

Brian Glanville

Konstas Yannakopoulos

Dhiren Patel

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

     Existing video chat based products enable participants to engage in video conferencing over remote distances. One of the problems facing people in these meetings is that they are constantly viewed by other participants in the video conference. There is no mechanism for a conference participant to conduct a side conversation or quickly refer to prepared documents without being seen by other participants without shutting off their video feed. Shutting off the video mid-meeting and turning it back on makes it obvious that an individual is not in front of the screen. This can be disruptive or counter productive to the video conference. A solution is provided that allows a user to press a button to loop video of themselves to other participants in the video conference. This enables a user to talk with others in the room while other participants view the looped video.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

     The looped video solution provided herein allows users to initiate a loop video mode in a video conference. In one form, a video conference participant presses a button on his/her screen or on other physical surroundings that results in video being looped from a previous recording. The participant can then talk with others in the room while the video is being looped to other participants in the meeting. The participant can press the button again to return to the video conference with live video without the other participants detecting that the user had temporarily left. For example, the button to initiate the looped video

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Copyright 2012 Cisco Systems, Inc.



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could be under the table or a foot pedal to allow a participant to press it without being seen by other video conference participants.

     In one example, a participant in a video conference may want to discuss an important topic brought up during the meeting with a subset of the attendees without other attendees noticing. For example, if a customer participant is reciting a list of requi...