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Method for securely accessing systems via an access card and the entry of an access code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000216892D
Publication Date: 2012-Apr-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

An access card with a code entry device (i.e., keypad) being located on the access card itself is disclosed. The keypad, appropriately sized and designed such that the card size is not adversely impacted, allowing the user to discretely enter their access code.

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Method for securely accessing systems via an access card and the entry of an access code

Disclosed is an access card with a code entry device (i.e., keypad) being located on the access card itself is disclosed. The keypad, appropriately sized and designed such that the card size is not adversely impacted, allowing the user to discretely enter their access code.

Many devices require that a user enter an access code. However, these devices, such as, a cash or ATM machine are placed such that a nearby observer (or perhaps a remote observer utilizing an optical magnification device, such as a telescope) can easily see the access code entered. There is a proliferation of these devices. No longer are they limited to ATM machines at banks. They can now be seen at places as diverse as gas station self-serve pumps, drive-in fast food restaurants and store checkout stands (where more often than not the store employee has a clear view of the keypad as the user enters their code).

Known solutions to this problem all involve physically obscuring visual access to the keypad of the device by means of some opaque shield. These shields typically come in two forms; either a very low shield that would only obstruct an observer's vision at very shallow angles, or a full shield that requires the user to insert their hand into an essentially opaque box, often at uncomfortable angles, and blindly enter their access code. The best known solution to this problem involves the user physically obscuring an observer's vision by using their own body to do so. There are a number of drawbacks to such a solution. First, the keypad might not be in a position such that this strategy is possible. Second, the user may place themselves in a position where even they can not see the keypad and therefore have difficulty entering their code. Finally, many users would be concerned at the impression they are presenting to any nearby observers.

Rather than the code entry device (i.e., keypad) being located on the card reader device, instead it is located on the access card itself. The keypad, appropriately sized and designed such that the card size is not adversely impacted, would allow the user to discretely enter their access code. There is a timeout for the entered access code, such that after this period, the code would have to be re-entered to allow authentication again. The main advantage of this design is the added security and privacy granted to the user. Also, the user is able to discretely ent...