Browse Prior Art Database

Phenol and Bisphenol-A Plants

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000217189D
Publication Date: 2012-May-04

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

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PHENOL AND BISPHENOL-A PLANTS

PRESENTED TO

1995 DeWlTT PETROCHEMICAL REVIEW

HOUSTON, TEXAS

MARCH 21-23 1995

BY


H. E. GIMPEL

DR. A. P. MOORE


M. J. VAN SICKELS

AND

J. E. WALLACE


THE M. W. KELLOGG COMPANY

HOUSTON, TEXAS

KELLOGG



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INTRODUCTION

Phenol is an important intermediate organic chemical which is used as a feedstock for producing, ultimately, a wide range of thermosetting and thermoplastic resins. A large part of the total worldwide phenol production - more than 30% - is first converted to bisphenol-A (BPA) which is then usedto produce polycarbonates, epoxy resins and other engineering plastics.

BPA is by far the fastest growing segment of the phenol market with a worldwide growth rate predicted at 5 to 8% per annum over the next several years.

Thus we can expect future growth in phenol demand to be closely tied to bisphenol-A growth. We are already seeing new phenol plants being built together with new BPA plants, e.g. Nippon Steel's new phenol/BPA complex which started up in 1992 in Japan and Taiwan Prosperity Chemical Co's new phenol/BPA complex which is presently in startup at Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Kellogg, as a licensor of technology for the entire "chain" of phenol related chemicals (Dow-Kellogg cumene process, Kellogg-Hercules-BP phenol process and Dow-Kellogg BPA process), has examined the synergistic benefits of producers being in both the phenol and BPA business and even integrating these facilities to some degree.

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current phenol/BPAproducers and to discuss the benefits that these producers derive from being integrated producers.

Before entering into a general discussion we should point out that phenol and BPA integration almost inevitably means phenoVacetone and BPA integration since virtually all (95%) of phenol is produced from cumene oxidation
1 mole of co-product acetone for each mole of phenol which results in the formation of produced.

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BPA is produced by the reaction of 2 moles of phenol and 1mole of acetone. Thus, the BPA unit consumes 1/2 of the co-product acetone produced (assuming the phenol production matches that required for BPA).

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MARKET OVERVIEW

In the USA, all 4 BPA producers (Shell Chemical, Dow, GE and Aristech) are integrated upstream, with phenol plants located at the same site as BPA production facilities.

Shell is further integrated, both upstream and downstream, with a cumene plant upstream and epoxy resin facilities downstream.

Dow also is further integrated downstream with both polycarbonate and epoxy resin plants. Additionally, Dow does have a cumene plant albeit in Terneuzen, Holland, a long way from their phenol and BPA plants in Oyster Creek, Texas.

GE is another phenol/BPA producer who is heavily integrated downstream with polyphenyleneoxide (PPO), polycarbonate and polyetherimide (Ultem) plants.

Aristech is the sole US producer of phenol and BPA which is not further integrated. They...