Browse Prior Art Database

LIGHT OLEFIN PRODUCFIO N FROM SUPERFLW AND MAXOFIN FCC TECHNOLOGIES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000217511D
Publication Date: 2012-May-08
Document File: 5 page(s) / 413K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 23% of the total text.

Page 01 of 5

t

PAPER FOR PRESENTATION TO THE 2001 ARTC PETROCHEMICAL CONFERENCE Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

KBR Paper No. 1685

12-14 February 2001

LIGHT OLEFIN PRODUCFION FROM SUPERFLW" AND MAXOFIN" FCC TECHNOLOGIES

BY: M.F.GILBERT, M.J.TALLMAN, W.C.P€ITERSON, P.K.NICCUM Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc.

Houston, Texas

ProDvlene Production is a Growth Business

The majority of propylene is obtained as a byproduct of ethylene manufacture or Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) gasoline production. Approximately 70% of world supply is produced from liquid steam crackers, where the relative proportion of propylene to ethylene (P/E) ranges from 0.4 to


0.65 on a weight basis. The remainder of propylene is derived from high severity gasoline mode FCC operations. The base value of propylene is tied to its consumption as alkylate for gasoline blending. The incremental value at any time depends on the balance between supply and demand, especially for nonfuel uses. The higher values are determined by incorporation into polypropylene and chemicals such as acrylonitrile, cumene, propylene oxide, and oxoalcohols. Demand from these polyolefins and chemical sectors is resulting in predictions of 4 to 5% growth per annum worldwide for propylene consumption. I n fact, the availability of propylene is a supply driver in itself and this has lead to growth in consumption of 6 to 7% per year (ECN, 6-12 Nov 00, p 56).

Propylene supply from ethylene expansion is not projected to meet demand, especially with the disproportionate increase in new ethylene produced from ethane feedstock (P/E N 0.01). In many parts of the world, where the fuels market is heavily dependent on diesel, produced with low severity FCC operations, the future for propylene supply increases from these FCC sources are limited. To meet the predicted shortfall Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) offers the Superfle?" process, which produces high yields of propylene from low value and readily available olefin containing streams, and the MAXOFIN" FCC process which produces propylene from traditional FCC feedstocks. The Supemex process was developed by Arc0 Chemical Co.LP (now Lyondell Chemcial Co.) and is exclusively licensed by KBR. MAXOFIN FCC was jointly developed by KBR and Mobil Oil Corp (now ExxonMobil).

KBR's Sumrflex Process SUDDlies Low CostProDvlene

Feedstocks for Superflex are comprised mainly of light olefins, ranging from & through Cs, and typically contain various quantities of paraffins, aromatics, and naphthenes. Potential sources of Supemex feeds can be found at distressed values in many locales due to either lack of demand or perhaps due to changing product markets. In both the olefin plant and refinery, much of the light olefin containing streams (pyrolysis gasoline; FCC G's and LCN; Coker and visbreaker naphthas) are used in gasoline blending. Gasoline regulations are changing throughoutthe world in response to environmental pressures. Reductions in vapor pressure, olefins, and oxygenate specifications and removal of lead are reducing the blend value of these components. Asanother


Page 02 of 5

ARTC PetrochemicalConference

12 - 14 February 2000

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

KBR Paper No. 1685

example of potential Superflex feed, consider the case where steam cracker butadiene and Cs

diolefins are not extracted; these components may currently be hydrogenated to p...