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Environmental Control Considerations for a Modern Cumene/Phenol Complex

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000218587D
Publication Date: 2012-Jun-05
Document File: 50 page(s) / 2M

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Page 01 of 50

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL CONSIDERATIONS

FOR A MODERN CUMENE / PHENOL COMPLEX

1990 DeWitt Petrochemical Review March 27-29, 1990

Prepared by

Hassan M. Gomaa, PhD. John Waterous James E. Wallace, P.E.

THE M.W. KELLOGG COMPANY HOUSTON, TEXAS



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TABLE OF CONTENTS


1. ABSTRACT


II. INTRODUCTION

111. PROCESS DESCRIPTIONS


A. Cumene


B. Phenol


IV. AIR EMtSSfONS


A. Sources of Air Emissions


6. ControlTechnologies


1.


A. Sources of Wastewater


8. Pre-TreatmentSystems


C. CombinedTreatment Facilities


VI. WASTE ORGANICS


A. Sources of Waste Organics


B. ControlTechnologies


VII. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS


VIII. REFERENCES

e

Gl


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1. ABSTRACT

This paper discusses the environmental control issues related to two commercially important process technologies, namely: 1) the process to produce cumene by alkylation of benzene with propylene, and 2) the cumene peroxidation process to produce phenol and acetone.

Sources of air emissions within a typical cumene/phenol complex are identified and quantified, and wastewater discharges are discussed. In addition, commercially available control technologies for the management of air emissions, wastewater discharges, and hazardous wastes are discussed.

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II. INTRODUCTION

Essentially all cumene consumed in the United States is used to produce phenol. Phenol is a commercially important synthetic organic chemical intermediate whose main uses are in production of phenolic resins, bisphenol A, and caprolactam. Cumene peroxidation and toluene oxidation are two of the processes being used for synthetic phenol production. Three other processes are no longer used in the United States, Western Europe, or Japan and are in limited use in other regions: benzene sulfonation, benzene chlorination, and the Raschig process. All commercial cumene is manufactured by the alkylation of benzene with propylene.

a The cumene peroxidation process to produce phenol is currently regarded as the only available process having industrialsignificance. More than 92% of world phenol capacity as of January 1, 1988 was based on cumene peroxidation. It is also the most competitive process for acetone, which is produced as a coproduct of cumene peroxidation; in 1987 and 1988, almost 95% of United States acetone productionwas as a coproduct of phenol productionfrom cumene. (1,231

The synthetic processes to produce phenol and acetone also produce pollutants in the form of air contaminant emissions, wastewater, and hazardous wastes. Discussed in this paper are the control technologies available to minimize the pollutants associated with the benzene alkylation process to produce cumene, and the cumene peroxidation processto produce phenol and acetone. Various waste minimization techniques for mitigating the overall environmental impacts of phenol processing are also discussed. The waste minimization techniques are based on recovering contaminants from air emissions and process wastewater discharges as products/coproducts...