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Turnaround Planning for an Ammonia Plant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000218722D
Publication Date: 2012-Jun-06

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Page 01 of 29

TURNAROUND PLANNING FOR
AN AMMONIA PLANT

            BY
SCOTT FEULESS AND So NADHAVAN THE H oWo KELLOGG COMPANY

HOUSTON, TEXAS, U.SoAo

AUGUST 28, 1986


Page 02 of 29

TABLE OF CONTENTS


I. Introduction .......................................... 1


II. Identification of Scope ............................... 1


III. Preparation of Work List .............................. 2


IV. Estimating ............................................ 2


V. Overall Planning ...................................... 3


VI. Arrow Diagrams ........................................ 4


VII. Barcharts ............................................. 6


VIII. Progress Reporting ...................................


IX.


X.


xI.

Wrapping-up and Revising Estimates .................... 9

Choosing a Computer System ............................ 9

Conclusions ...................................

APPENDICES


A. Typical Overall Work List for an Ammonia Plant .... ii


B. Sample Reports .................................... 19


Page 03 of 29

Page 1

I. INTRODUCTION

  ¯ All process plant owners perform plant turnaround, on a periodic basis, when inspection, cleaning and major maintenance are done on all the equipment. The turnaround may take anywhere from 2 weeks to 7 weeks depending on the scope of work and the size of the complex. Any unnecessary prolongation of the duration beyond what is necessary represents lost production time and lost revenues. Hence, proper planning, control and execution are of paramount importance from the standpoint of minimizing the cost of the turnaround as well as the plant downtime.

      Planning any process plant turnaround consists of an extremely wide variety of tasks. In addition to planning the actual work to be done, there are many other planning considerations, such as material availability, awarding contracts, heavy equipment availability, layout of portable facilities, supplying of power and high pressure water, and scheduling of manpower. These items will, for the most part, be the same from ¯ turnaround to turnakound and can be handled by anyone with experience and a "things to do" list. The actual shutdown work, however, is always somewhat different from turnaround to turnaround. New activity lists are drawn up each time and new plans must be made. These activity lists usually contain thousands of items, and it is an immense task to schedule them. Due to the large, statistical nature of this task, it is a problem well suited to a computer.

     This paper describes the methodology and control.


II. IDE~]TIFICATION OF SCOPE

of turnaround planning

     The first thing which must be done, for any turnaround, is scope identification. One must know what work is to be done before one can plan it. This stage is very important and should have begun immediat@ly after the Previous turnaround. As soon as a job which must be done at turnaround is identified, it should be written up, preferably as a work order, and passed to the planning department for evaluation. Many of these will be based...