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Computerized Plant Design an Update from the M.W. Kellogg Company Houston

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000218798D
Publication Date: 2012-Jun-07

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

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S( IF JTER]ZED PLANT DE' [( N AN UPDATE

FROM

T t[ IVlo Wo KELLOGG COMP: ~I' Y
HOUSTON

BY: Ao Po COOPER & Ko RYDER

DATE~ ].6- JAN- lC:J86



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Computerized Plant Design

PREAMBLE :

A limited number of Engineering, Procurement and Construction companies have real production experience of Computerized 3D Plant Design. Most have found that a wide gulf exists between CADD vendors claims for their equipment and software, and what really can be accomplished in a production enviroment. The amount of effort a buyer must expend, in order to upgrade a system to meet the real needs, is considerably more than generally realized or expected.

This is a discussion based on first hand experience in

M. W. Kellogg's Houston office over a period of eighteen months since mid 1984, and deals specifically with a recent project.

Page.2 of ~ ;I


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"Computerized Plant Design

This project was the third executed by M.W.Kellogg using Computerized 3D modeling.

It was a 80,000 MTPY Ethylene Unit located in China. Part of the engineering was performed by the Chinese.

Kellogg was responsible for developing the overall plot layout (see sketch I), and also had the responsibility for complete design and engineering the furnace area which contained 5-millisecond furnaces, designated 'A' through 'E'.

The extent of Kellogg detailed engineering required the complete design and dimensioning of all piping within the furnace area.

Isometrics for all alloy lines and carbon steel 3" and larger were required.

Carbon steel lines 2" and smaller were to be detailed with sufficient information for the Chinese to draw isometrics.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

of

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Computerized Plant Design

SCOPE OF 3-D MODELING:

3-D modelling was implemented using the Intergraph Plant Design System. This was done for the entire furnace area plus the transfer line to the fractionator.

Since this project had an extremely tight schedule, and was the largest project undertaken using the 3-D system, it was decided the project would be done with a partially parallel manual effort implemented to guarantee a fall-back situation if anything failed on the 3-D modeling system.

MANUAL ACTIVITIES:

  Planning was done for Furnace 'C" only, using the plan- duction method for all lines 3" and larger. These drawings were issued for review by all disciplines for the routing of the pipes, stress analysis, and furnace platforming arrangement. These drawings were updated with comments received from all disciplines and issued for production release.

Although 3-D modeling had started, 2" and smaller Alloy lines continued to be routed on the plan-duction drawings per our fall-back procedures for the project.

  After six weeks of 3-D modeling, sufficient confidence had been established in the ability of the Intergraph 3-D plant design system to sustain the considerable load, hence the parallel manual effort was discontinued.

COMPUTERIZED ACTIVITIES:

During the later stages of planning, th...