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Mild Resid Hydrocracking for Heavy Oil Upgrading

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000218806D
Publication Date: 2012-Jun-07

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FOURTH UNITAWUNDP CONFERENCEON HEAVY CRUDE AND TAR SANDS

PAPER NO.86

 THIS IS A PREPRINT - SUBJECTTOCORRECTlON (COPYRIGHT AND PUBLICATIONRIGHTS RESERVED)

MILD RESID HYDROCRACKING FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING

H. Sue, M. Sekino, and M. Yoshimoto, ldemitsu Kosan Company, Ltd. R.B. Armstrong and B. Klein, The M.W. Kellogg Company

INTRODUCTION

0 A number of heavy oil upgrading processes have been commercialized. Others are in various stages of devebpment prwsses are based ORcarbon rejection or hydrogen addition. Each of these approaches has its disadvantages: high yield of fuel-grade coke for the former and high capital investment, catalyst cost and hydrogen consumption for the latter. Recognizing these limitations, Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. (IKC)and The

- - M . X . J k l b g g C a m p + b w c t t s s e R i t ~ ~
approach, employing hydrogen addition at moderate
pressure with f l

drawbacks.

-

. . .

m

Mild Resid Hydrocracking (MRH) has been under development since 1980 by IKC,as a member of the Research Association for Petroleum Alternatives Development (RAPAD) sponsored by the Japanese government,and The M.W.

               Kellogg Company. The name chosen for this process emphasizes the mild operating pressure compared to other resid hydrocracking technologies.

Bench scale data were used by Kellogg to provide the design of a 10 barreVday MRHpilot plant, which was constructed in late 1985 at Idemitsu's Anegasaki Pilot Center. More than5,000 hours of pilot plant operation have produced a wealth of information on product yields, plant results, and summarizes the current status of pmess development toward commercialization.

PROCESS DESCRIPTION

Figure 1 shows the simplified MRH flow scheme. A slurry consisting of heavy oil feed and fine catalyst is preheated in a furnace and flows into the reactor vessel. Hydrogen enters the bottom of the reactor and flows upward through the reaction mixture, maintaining the catalyst suspension in the reaction mixture. Heavy oil cracks to form distillates and undergoes demetalkation via thermal and catalytic reactions. Vapor/slurry disengaging occurs in the upper section of the reactor.

The reactor effluentvapor contains hydrogen, light gases, and disullates. The reactor liquid effluent slurry 011

(SLO) contains catalyst (with coke and metals, vacuum resid and a small amount of vacuum gas oil. The MRH process features two different options €or recovery of liquids from the reactor effluent slurry. The fmt is solids concentration by a centrifuge, followed by drying of the centrifuge wet cake in a rotary dryer. The second option involves evaporating the liquid fiom the SLO in a system, coke (including fine coke panicles) is removed from the fte-

                        ' rtre mtaiyst Wu- the regenerator. Thus, the upgraded product oil is essentially

Dry catalyst and coke flow into the fluidized bed regenerator, where the coke is removed by burning. Regenerated catalyst is recycled to the MRH reactor. A slipstream catalyst purge serves to maintain a con...