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The Application of Computerized Maintenance in Fertilizer Facilities

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000220002D
Publication Date: 2012-Jul-18

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

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Page 01 of 27

THE APPLICATION OF COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE
IN FERTILIZER FACILITIES

BY


A. ANTHONY


D. M. BAILEY


R. NORTHING


K. WOOD

Recent developments in. computer software and micro-computer hardware networks make it attractive for fertilizer complexes to implement on-line interactive maintenance management and inventory~control programs. Specific programs for ,turnaround planning and predictive .failure analysis are also available.

Kellogg Plant Services has implemented all of ~these programs and is encouraged with results and the potential for future applications.


Page 02 of 27

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction

Criteria for Selection of Hardware and. Software

Computerized Maintenance Programs


A. KELCAM


B. Condition Monitoring


C. Turnaround Planning and Management


I) TMS


2) Micronet

Other Useful optional computer Programs

Conclusions and Recommendations Page


II.


III.


IV.


V.


Page 03 of 27

INTRODUCTION

The micro-computer first entered the industry in 1975. .As a result of much competition and advances in technology, sophisticated micro-computer systems and software programs are now available for low capital, expenditures. For example, M.W. Kellogg has just installed for a client a micro-computer system composed of: three IBM PCs, -60 Mb of hard disk storage, three printers, 200 Mb tape backup, auxiliary equipment and an omninet network that permits on-line interaction between all users at a hardware cost less than $35,000. This system, with the selection of available software, will permit the plant to manage and perform routine maintenance, inventory control functions, turnaround maintenance, condition-monitoring programs, and various administrative programs more efficiently than can be-achieved using manual programs. A few years ago a computer with this capability would have required a major capital investment.

Over the past few years, M.W. Kellogg has been
successfully using micro-computers for routine
maintenance, inventory control, turnaround planning, condition monitoring and various administrative activities. Of particular interest is more than two years of experience with the use of micro-computers in a 1000 TPD fertilizer ammonia complex. Even though these computer systems are installed at remote locations, the on-stream time has been excellent and all of the computer software programs have been implemented without a requirement for computer engineers or computer
programmers. Experienced maintenance planners or maintenance technicians have introduced the programs to the. clients' organization for their operation.

The micro-computer, when used as a management tool, can. provide management, and supervisors with the reports and data that permit~ a rapid performance evaluation and scheduling of priority work through tracking of backlog activities. Maintenance management has become a technology and is not just a nuts and bolts repair service. More and more plant facilities are taking advantage of this available technology with resulting improvemen...