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Portable Geiger counter and wireless application for device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000220451D
Publication Date: 2012-Jul-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for communication between a cell phone and wireless Geiger counter. A cell phone application (app) controls the incoming communication and receives readings from the Geiger counter. The Global Positioning System (GPS) in either the cell phone or the Geiger counter is used to correlate the radiation reading to the user’s location. Maps of individual radiation readings can be made by combining individual readings from one or more sensors. These could be sent to subscribers (e.g., via social network email) to make them aware of local environmental hazards.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

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Portable Geiger counter and wireless application for device

Currently there are several types of Geiger counters, including portable devices that can be classified as survey meters, small personal dosimeters, and wall-mounted devices. Some devices can communicate to a central computer wirelessly. A problem exists as to how to share the radiation readings so that doses and dose patterns can be observed. This is most relevant in situations such as the accidental release of nuclear matter (e.g., from a nuclear power accident), or because of terrorist activities (e.g., the release of a weapon of mass destruction).

The invention includes communication between a cell phone and wireless Geiger counter. A cell phone application (app) controls the incoming communication and receives readings from the Geiger counter. The Global Positioning System (GPS) in either the cell phone or the Geiger counter is used to correlate the radiation reading to the user's location. Maps of individual radiation readings can be made by combining individual readings from one or more sensors. These could be sent to subscribers (e.g., via social network email) to make them aware of local environmental hazards.

The sensor package contains separate Geiger counters, each sensitive to beta, gamma/x-rays, alpha particles, or neutrons. The firmware allows the user to decide which counter to activate for a given measurement; the default is to take a measurement from each. The readout on the phone displays the dose reading for each type of radiation (e.g., from each sensor).

In order to operate autonomously, the Geiger counter has a display to show the doses measured.

The Geiger counter includes a low-activity source that is unshuttered, in order to ensure proper calibration and operation. In addition, the operation and the calibration could be automated.

To ensure the accuracy of measurements, the Geiger counter is instructed to repeat a measurement if the first measurement exceeds a predetermined threshold or if the GPS determines that the Geiger counter is in a region that has a report of an above-background reading.

Radiation measurements could be initiated by a user, made at fixed time (or distance) intervals, or at adaptive time (or distance) intervals (e.g., more frequently when the radiation level is high).

The notification to make a measurement can be made remotely, from public safety personnel, for example.

Applications of this technology could be the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at airports, Homeland Security (police), nuclear power plants, etc.

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Analytics could be applied to the data to look for patterns (e.g., areas of high radiation measurements, radiation drift, etc.) so that the public could be warned about which regions to avoid.

The cell phone app could display a metric related to the severity of individual readings...