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Real-time virtual imaging of cochlear electrode insertion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000221587D
Publication Date: 2012-Sep-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 166K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) scan data of the temporal bone, including the cochlea, is obtained from the patient pre-operatively. The scan is of sufficiently high resolution to see the fine structures of the cochlea, in particular the basilar membrane and the soft tissue lining of the cochlea.

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Title 

Real-time virtual imaging of cochlear electrode insertion

Problem Addressed 

Three-dimensional (3D) scan data of the temporal bone, including the cochlea, is obtained from the patient pre-operatively. The scan is of sufficiently high resolution to see the fine structures of the cochlea, in particular the basilar membrane and the soft tissue lining of the cochlea.

The surgeon prepares the mastoidectomy, posterior tympanotomy, and facial recess in the usual way. Usually, the surgeon has the benefit of a single view of the cochlea and the electrode as it is being inserted. This view is normal to the axis of the electrode, which can make it difficult to insert.  In addition, the cochleostomy is small and the fine structures of the cochlea can be difficult to see. Any view of these is further obstructed by the electrode itself. 

The ideal view of the cochlea during electrode insertion is normal to the axis of the cochlea helix. The required surgical approach for cochlear implantation does not allow this view; furthermore, because the cochlea is actually a cavity within bone, creating this view would destroy the cochlea. 

Novelty Statement

High-resolution scanning provides a view of the cochlea during electrode insertion that is normal to the axis of the cochlea helix.

Description (Components, Process)

The high-resolution view is presented on a monitor or other secondary display so that the normal view is still accessible and the additional view is not a distraction. Preferably, the additional view, constructed by superimposing the real time positional data of the...