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Sources and Delivery of Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000221596D
Publication Date: 2012-Sep-14

Publishing Venue

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Pullman Kellogg

ABSTRACT

    This paper presents results from a comprehensive study by Pullman Kellogg, with assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and National Cryo-Chemics Incorporated (NCI), of tile carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery.

    General observations from a survey of carbon dioxide sources within the geographic areas of potential EOR are presented.

   The costs, such as purchase, production, processing, and transportation, associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination are discussed.

    Specific cases to illustrate the use of the maps and cost.charts generated in the study have been examined.

Prepared for DOE under Contract EX-76-01-2515

SOURCES AND DELIVERY OF CARBON DIOXIDE
FOR

ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

By,


M. M, SHAH

A. E. COVER

Pullman Kellogg

Three Greenway Plaza East

Houston, Texas 77046


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SOURCES AND DELIVERY OF CARBON DIOXIDE

FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

Introduction:

   The surge in the U. S. oil import coupled with increasing oil prices
has created increased interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques as means to obtain greater domestic oil production. Miscible flooding methods using carbon dioxide (C02) as a material capable of recovering additional quantitites of oil from depleted, water out reservoirs has been investigated by the laboratory tests and field tests. Prelininary estimates indicate that 5-I0 billion barrels of oil could be produced from enhanced oil recovery by CO2 flooding. This might require upwards of 40-50 trillion standard cubic feet of C02~

   Future plans for EOR by CO2 flooding will depend on the availability and the cost of CO2. Pullman Kellogg recently completed a comprehensive evalua- tion of the supply and cost of CO2 for EOR. The study was conducted for the United States Department of Energy under the Contract EX-76-C-01-2515, with the assistance from Gulf Universities Research Consortium (GURC) and the

National Cryo-Chemics, Inc. (NCI). This paper presents the highlights of
our final report (1) for the study. The objectives of the study were threefold and included:

I. Mapping of all significant sources of carbon dioxide on regional maps in a quantitative manner so that through the use of maps and legends a description of the sources in terms of quantity and quality might be available.


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2. Evaluation of all the costs associated with delivering the carbon dioxide from its source to its destination. These include purchase, production, processing, and transportation costs.

3. Examination of specific cases to show examples of the use of the maps and cost charts generated.

Carbon dioxide sources and availability

    The sources of CO2, shown on four regional maps in Figures I through 4, consisted of natural deposits, industrial sources such as process and cement plants, natural gas treating plants, SNG plants, refineries and power plants. Each source is characterized as to type,...