Browse Prior Art Database

Contextual & Repetitive GPS Points of Interest

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000222374D
Publication Date: 2012-Sep-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 604K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method for modifying and creating Global Positioning System (GPS) points of interest (POIs) based on repetitive behavioral patterns and the usage of dynamic or static POIs.  Once POIs are created, the system can suggest an optimal route based on those repetitive POIs.

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Contextual & Repetitive GPS Points of Interest

As Global Positioning System (GPS) users get to know cities or neighborhoods within cities, their reliance on a GPS drops significantly. However, these devices still are still useful when the user must navigate to an unfamiliar address. A typical car with an embedded GPS leaves the GPS in an On state. Despite this state, most GPSs do not gather additional information based on the behaviors of the drivers. This information can be beneficial in constructing optimal paths when a new unknown address is entered into the system. The invention solves this problem.

Disclosed is a system and method for modifying and creating GPS points of interest based on repetitive behavioral patterns and the usage of dynamic or static Points of Interest (POIs). Once POIs are created, the system can suggest an optimal route based on those repetitive POIs.

Advantages


• Accurate arrival estimation when POIs that are likely to be included are factored into time estimates and routes


• POIs are added for popular locations at which a user has stopped, and are likely to stop again (e.g., coffee shop)


• Even though users might not necessarily need directions to these common POIs, they do want to drive by them or have the GPS continuously adjust for the deviation when going to a final destination

Implementation: Determining POIs, where POIs are the most obvious destinations and more broadly defined as preferred paths


1. A user interacts with their GPS just as they would today


2. A threshold preference is set by the user or the system

3. The threshold defines how many times a user must visit a particular location or path for it to automatically be added as a point of interest or path of preference

4. The user visits multiple locations within a city, regardless of those locations being programmed into the GPS


5. When the threshold preference is satisfied (Step 3):


A. A new point of interest is automatically added to the GPS device

B. The GPS prompts the user asking if they would like to add the destination as a POI


C. The order of the POI is increased or decreased based on popularity

6. If no information about the context of what the POI is, is determined based on the GPS software:

A. A lookup is done to determine based on latitude and longitude if a location has been entered since the map software was last updated


B. The user is prompted to name the POI

C. A name is inferred based on most popular visiting time (e.g., 8:00 am for 5 minutes might be "morning drop-off")


7. Additional information about the POI for each trip may be saved


A. Average Length of time spent at POI (e.g., user always spends at least

1


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15 minutes at this stop before continuing)

B. Likelihood that a route in a given direction will pass through the POI (e.g., 85% of the time the user goes to this POI when heading North on Route 280)


C. Time of day visited


D. Day of wee...