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Robotic Control Interface for a Medical Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000222802D
Publication Date: 2012-Oct-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

In robotic surgery it is desirable to make the robotic control interface for the medical device as simple to use and intuitive as possible, so that the surgeon can focus on the surgery rather than controlling the device. This article describes a robotic control interface that provides device control through detection of ordinary, intuitive hand motions. The figure below depicts a controller for the interface in position on the surgeon’s hand. The controller is worn on the surgeon’s dominant hand like a glove, and can be secured thereon by straps around the wrist and fingers. The device contains sensors that recognize movement of the surgeon’s hand and mimic these hand movements on the surgical device. As shown below, a pair of bend sensors extends between the connecting straps down the outer surface of the hand. The bend sensors detect extension, compression and torsion of the hand. Upon detecting the motion the bend sensors input a signal to a computer interface, which converts the signal into robotic control signals. The control signals are input to the robotic device to drive the corresponding motion of the device. For example, rotation of the surgeon’s wrist would produce an output signal that is processed by the robot as a command to rotate the medical device. The signal could be interpreted to rotate the device shaft or end effector. Similarly, bending of the surgeon’s fingers would produce a signal to articulate the device either in the left or right direction, depending upon the bending direction of the fingers. Additional detected motions can include a pinching of the thumb and forefinger to produce a signal directing the robot to close the device jaws.

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Robotic Control Interface for a Medical Device

In robotic surgery it is desirable to make the robotic control interface for the medical device as simple to use and intuitive as possible, so that the surgeon can focus on the surgery rather than controlling the device.  This article describes a robotic control interface that provides device control through detection of ordinary, intuitive hand motions.

The figure below depicts a controller for the interface in position on the surgeon’s hand.  The controller is worn on the surgeon’s dominant hand like a glove, and can be secured thereon by straps around the wrist and fingers.  The device contains sensors that recognize movement of the surgeon’s hand and mimic these hand movements on the surgical device.  As shown below, a pair of bend sensors extends between the connecting straps down the outer surface of the hand.  The bend sensors detect extension, compression and torsion of the hand.  Upon detecting the motion the bend sensors input a signal to a computer interface, which converts the signal into robotic control signals.  The control signals are input to the robotic device to drive the corresponding motion of the device.  For example, rotation of the surgeon’s wrist would produce an output signal that is processed by the robot as a command to rotate the medical device.  The signal could be interpreted to rotate the device shaft or end effector.  Similarly, bending of the surgeon’s fingers would produce a...