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METHOD TO MEASURE THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LIGHTING LEVELS ON BANDWIDTH UTILIZATION FOR VIDEO APPLICATIONS IN AN IP NETWORK

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000223144D
Publication Date: 2012-Nov-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 167K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Mike Paget: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is provided for simultaneously measuring video quality and bandwidth utilization to determine the effects of various environmental lighting conditions on video quality and bandwidth utilization in a video distribution system.

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  METHOD TO MEASURE THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LIGHTING LEVELS ON BANDWIDTH UTILIZATION FOR VIDEO APPLICATIONS IN AN IP NETWORK

AUTHORS:

Mike Paget

Jason Burk

Rick Atkisson

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    A method is provided for simultaneously measuring video quality and bandwidth utilization to determine the effects of various environmental lighting conditions on video quality and bandwidth utilization in a video distribution system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    It is well known that lighting affects video quality (based on gain and signal-to- noise ratio) in the communication of video across a network. Moreover, video quality affects bandwidth utilization and bandwidth utilization affects total cost of ownership (TCO) for customers. Techniques are presented herein to gather objective data and metrics for the effects of environmental lighting level on the utilization of network bandwidth when transporting video over an Internet Protocol (IP) based network.

The methodology is as follows.

A controlled environment (e.g., a small room approximately 4 m square) is used

such that no external lighting or reflections from other surfaces are present.

A controlled lighting system is present in the environment so that lighting color, temperature, luminance, radiant angle and luminance levels are calibrated for precise lighting and data points.

    A camera is placed such that its field-of-view is consumed with a neutral 18% gray surface which acts as the testing subject matter. If the camera has variable settings

Copyright 2012 Cisco Systems, Inc. 1


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(gain, contrast, gamma, etc.) it is then calibrated to the lighting by use of a grayscale card with a range from 0 IRE to 100% IRE to insure dynamic range is optimally set. When the camera is calibrated (if necessary) the video signal from the camera is output (at the appropriate resolution, frame-rate, and color space as indicated per test data requirements) to an oscilloscope that measures luminance, color vectors, and signal-to- noise ratio. This is generally defined as waveform monitor, vectorscope, and temporal Signal-to-Noise (SNR) monitor. This is where the original objective video quality including SNR data points are captured.

    The video signal is then routed to a standards-based H.264 (or any other codec) hardware video encoder that encodes video into IP packets. These packets are then sent to an IP switch configured to create a Local Area Network (LAN). The switch port is monitored for incoming bandwidth rate of the IP packets. These packets are also captured for deeper analysis of the video packets. This will gather knowledge of the bandwidth requirements a...