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Browse Prior Art Database

Spawning Affinity Cohorts in Crowd Sourcing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000223813D
Publication Date: 2012-Nov-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed are systems and a method to provide a means to identify logical subgroups while engaging a system of crown sourcing to outsource tasks. The inventive step is in two parts: the identification of logical affinity groups from the initial crowd sourcing and the automated business logic that introduces individuals in this affinity group, with a view to deriving logical pairings of individuals to achieve a desired end goal.

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Spawning Affinity Cohorts in Crowd Sourcing

In situations where crowd sourcing is used to outsource tasks to a large distributed group of people, logical subgroups often exist that do not naturally manifest. The disclosed systems and method provide a means to solve this problem.

The invention is best explained by an example:


Crowd sourcing tasks come in many forms (e.g., Brainstorming Tasks, Design Tasks, Knowledge Tasks, Promotional Tasks, Testing Tasks, etc.). A user sends a note to a broader set of project teams. The user was interested in intellectual property regarding
a specific subject. The user's note was received by several thousands of persons, of which 20 or 30 individuals responded with suggestions for patent filings. In the end, approximately 15 were filed. When the note went out, individuals had self-organized into teams to help collaborate in the response.

If implemented, the inventive step of this invention could have further helped that user. A second step (i.e., the inventive step) associated with the crowd sourcing task looks for affinity groupings within the crowd sourced audience, with the end goal of suggesting and motivating pairings of the right individuals to achieve the user's goal. In this case, the invention uses a combination of factors to motivate these affinity groups. For example:


 To identify master inventors with subject matter expertise (pulled from a skills persona) in the relevant area


 To identify engineers with some expertise in the relevant area


 To identify the social network of relationships surrounding individuals, in order to group individuals who have worked together and that satisfy the latter two criteria

Hence, the inventive step is in two parts:


1. The identification of logical affinity groups from the initial crowd sourcing and,

2. The automated business logic that introduces individuals in this affinity group, with a view to deriving logical pairings of individuals to achieve a desired end goal

In the preferred embodiment, these affinity groups can transpire after the initial response to a crowd sourced task (e.g., task goes to 10,000 people from which 500 respond and logical affinity groups are suggested by the system after this response). Alternately, these affinity groups can transpire directly after the crowd sourced request is made, where the spidering and auto-identification of affinity groups takes place after the task has been communicated.

The implementation of the invention is relatively straightforward. Associated with the crowd sourced task is some meta-detail selected by the requester (e.g., skills, expertise, skill level, seniority). This meta-detail is used as a vehicle to guide the request, and is used to identify logical affinity groups against this qualification. For example, if ski...