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System and Method for configuring an Eclipse IDE Environment for development against various Eclipse based platforms

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000226406D
Publication Date: 2013-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A system and method for configuring an Eclipse integrated development environment (IDE) for development against various Eclipse based platforms is disclosed.

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System and Method for configuring an Eclipse IDE Environment for development against various Eclipse based platforms

Disclosed is a system and method for configuring an Eclipse integrated development environment (IDE) for development against various Eclipse based platforms.

One of Eclipse's main design goals is to create an extensible platform that would promote the integration of tools into a single IDE. From the beginning. Eclipse was designed to streamline development of new function (i.e. plug-ins) that could be deployed into the IDE environment. One of the methodologies that Eclipse uses to accomplish this is self-hosting. Specifically, this means the ability to launch a duplicate instance of the running platform with only the changes that the user has created for the new environment. This methodology works well for users who are creating new plug-ins that will eventually be deployed as new tools with the base IDE.

Today, the Eclipse Rich Client Platform (RCP) and Embedded Rich Client Platform (eRCP) are becoming more and more popular as technology platforms for building and deploying applications. RCP is a subset of the original IDE platform and eRCP is a mobile device derivative of the RCP platform. Since both of these platforms are subsets of the initial IDE environment, the tooling for building applications on these platforms is primarily the Eclipse IDE (i.e. SDK and other add-ons to the SDK environment). While Eclipse's self-hosting methodology simplifies development of add-ons to the Eclipse IDE, this same methodology makes it difficult to construct applications that will be deployed onto other platforms. The Eclipse IDE is not one that can easily be reconfigured to target environments that are not self-hosting. This is possible, but difficult and error prone.

This is solved by using the extension point framework provided by Eclipse. The platform creator provides a set of metadata for configuring the Eclipse IDE environment. The metadata describes aspects of the target RCP environment such as default install location, preferred VM configuration settings, and preferred spec levels for VM compliance. Additional e...