Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD FOR PER HOP AND PER PATH WIRELESS MEDIA MONITORING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000226507D
Publication Date: 2013-Apr-10
Document File: 7 page(s) / 250K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Plamen Nedeltchev: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Techniques are presented herein for obtaining per hop and per path performance information from Control And Provisioning of Wireless Access Points (CAPWAP) protocol packets, initially designed and designated for provisioning and management only. A Type=3 header is provided that is designated for plain text, and Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS) encapsulated per hop performance monitoring allows the CAPWAP protocol to provide per hop performance information. A method is provided to manipulate the CAPWAP header to accommodate RTP header information that can be leveraged for per-hop performance monitoring within a Medianet media monitoring multi-hop network. In the modified CAPWAP specific encapsulations presented herein, the header information is used by a downstream network device or network analyzer to determine performance metrics for the network without decrypting the encrypted packet and without altering the content of the packet which can cause the packet to be dropped on arrival by the recipient device. This enables per hop performance monitoring over Wi-Fi™ networks, as well as per path (hop-by-hop) performance tracing capabilities over Wi-Fi networks.

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METHOD FOR PER HOP AND PER PATH WIRELESS MEDIA MONITORING

AUTHORS:

Plamen Nedeltchev

Aamer Akhter

Balachander Chandrasekaran

Eric Yu

Salman Asadullah

Michael O'Brien

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    Techniques are presented herein for obtaining per hop and per path performance information from Control And Provisioning of Wireless Access Points (CAPWAP) protocol packets, initially designed and designated for provisioning and management only. A Type=3 header is provided that is designated for plain text, and Datagram Transport Layer Security (DTLS) encapsulated per hop performance monitoring allows the CAPWAP protocol to provide per hop performance information. A method is provided to manipulate the CAPWAP header to accommodate RTP header information that can be leveraged for per-hop performance monitoring within a Medianet media monitoring multi-hop network. In the modified CAPWAP specific encapsulations presented herein, the header information is used by a downstream network device or network analyzer to determine performance metrics for the network without decrypting the encrypted packet and without altering the content of the packet which can cause the packet to be dropped on arrival by the recipient device. This enables per hop performance monitoring over Wi-Fi™ networks, as well as per path (hop-by-hop) performance tracing capabilities over Wi-Fi networks.

Copyright 2013 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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DETAILED DESCRIPTION

     In wired networks, Medianet provides per hop and per flow monitoring support. This is done by monitoring RTP flows across all nodes in the network. Each network element which is capable of media monitoring along the path is enabled to obtain the performance information. This works well since jitter, roundtrip time (RTT), and packet losses can be captured and an administrator can troubleshoot network congestion problems. For example, the administrator can determine whether a wide area network (WAN) edge device is having congestion or an enterprise switch is having congestion. This helps network administrators better deploy media applications.

    Wireless (IEEE 802.11) networks, aka Wi-Fi networks, are increasing their footprint, providing tremendous bandwidth and flexibility for end users, enabling mobility for the exploding number of end devices, and enabling new business models like Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and Work Your Way (WYW). The management and provisioning protocols in Wi-Fi are largely designed to deploy and manage large numbers of access points (APs), where the quality of service monitoring goes as far as providing some basic quality of service (QoS). Due to the lack of monitoring and per flow troubleshooting tools, Wi-Fi services continue to provide "best effort" type of services. From an Information Technology (IT) perspective, Wi-Fi services are unable to provide differentiated services for end users.

    With wireless networks becoming more pervasive and more access edge devices serving wireless...