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IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000226543D
Publication Date: 2013-Apr-15

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Nick Salvatore Arini: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method, executed by a processor, for serving sponsored content at a second media device associated with a first media device includes receiving by a processor, a unique identification of the first media device; storing the unique identification with the second media device; sending, by the processor, a sponsored content request and the unique identification to a sponsor; receiving, by the processor, sponsored content selected based on historical data related to the content viewed on the first media device.

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by Nick Salvatore Arini

ABSTRACT

            A method, executed by a processor, for serving sponsored content at a second media device associated with a first media device includes receiving by a processor, a unique identification of the first media device; storing the unique identification with the second media device; sending, by the processor, a sponsored content request and the unique identification to a sponsor; receiving, by the processor, sponsored content selected based on historical data related to the content viewed on the first media device.

Background

            “Cookies,” small files stored on an Internet client as a result of a visit by the client to a Web site, enable Web site servers to obtain a priori knowledge of previous Web site visits by the client.  This “prior knowledge” helps Web site servers “remember” the client’s preferences and other information.  When the client revisits the same Web site for which cookies are stored, the Web site server reads the cookies, and may use the data read from the file to more easily provide relevant content to the client during the current client visit.  As cross-media usage become more common (the center of which may be a shared space in a home, such as a living room) having similar a priori information about media exposure between or among different platforms may become useful.  In some circumstances, direct communication between media devices (for example, an Internet-enabled television and a second screen client such as a tablet) is possible.  However, currently, no standard exists for such direct communication.  

Summary

            A method, executed by a processor, for serving sponsored content at a second media device associated with a first media device includes receiving by a processor, a unique identification of the first media device; storing the unique identification with the second media device; sending, by the processor, a sponsored content request and the unique identification to a sponsor; receiving, by the processor, sponsored content selected based on historical data related to the content viewed on the first media device.

Description of the Drawings

            The detailed description refers to the following Figures in which like numerals refer to like items, and in which:

            Figure 1 illustrates an example environment in which media exposure information on a first media device is used in a process for selection of sponsored content on a second media device;

            Figures 2A and 2B illustrate example relationships among media devices operating in the environment of Figure 1; and

            Figures 3A and 3B illustrates example methods of serving sponsored content in the environment of Figure 1.

Detailed Description

            “Cookies,” typically small files stored on an Internet client as a result of a visit by the c...