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System and Method for leveraging metadata to optimize sound output

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000226637D
Publication Date: 2013-Apr-21
Document File: 2 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method for leveraging metadata to optimize sound output. The novel contribution of the invention is a system that comprises two devices for the generation and interpretation of sound-related metadata in order to create output that most closely resembles the musician’s intended sound.

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System and Method for leveraging metadata to optimize sound output

When a user listens to a musical piece, it is often difficult to determine whether the piece is heard exactly as the musician intended because output devices (e.g., headphones, earphones, speakers, etc.) vary in sound distribution and quality.

Although the user can alter the output via an equalizer, how the musician initially heard

the music remains unknown; therefore, the user does not know how to properly calibrate the equalizer to provide the most accurate sound reproduction on the output device.

To address this problem, the concept is a system and method for leveraging metadata to optimize sound output. The novel contribution of the invention is a system that comprises two devices for the generation and interpretation of sound-related metadata. Device A is used at the completion of the audio/wave file to generate metadata that

contains its final characteristics. The metadata (same as previous or a different one) also contains the audio output differences between the device used at the studio and other devices. Device B represents said "other" devices, such as the user's device. The metadata is available to and interpreted Device B, the user's system. The system makes the necessary changes, expressed in the metadata, to the user's system to optimize it for said audio/wave file.

This approach has an advantage over the prior art, which only maps the user's speakers to some high quality speakers, because even those high quality speakers could have drastically different characteristics than the speakers used during the recording. Furthermore, current approaches do not take into consideration the device settings that were used at the time of the recording or final tuning. Audio mastering

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