Browse Prior Art Database

COVERT TRIGGER FOR HEAD MOUNTED CAMERA

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000227408D
Publication Date: 2013-May-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

COVERT TRIGGER FOR HEAD MOUNTED CAMERA

     When a person is the victim of a crime such as an assault, mugging, or other personal attack, they often cannot remember details of the perpetrator or other relevant information.  Law enforcement often resorts using grainy imagery from security cameras nearby to find perpetrators or to review the incident.

     Alternative possibilities for monitoring dangerous situations are available using a head­mounted camera system such as one that can be worn over the eye (e.g., as a pair of eyeglasses).  Typically, the head­mounted camera system is connected to an information network (such as the internet or a phone network), e.g., by Wifi, Bluetooth, LTE, 4G, or 3G or any other appropriate connection and can send and receive information across the network.   The network connection can be used to provide location information and to stream live video information straight to a recipient, e.g., someone who can potentially help, police, medical, or other assisting agent.  The received information can also be used to document the observed events (such as a crime) for later review.

     A head mounted camera system can include a panic trigger such as  a "covert panic button" or other covert trigger that lets the wearer to covertly signal for help if they feel a more overt signal would endanger them.

     The problem then is how do we trigger such a panic button covertly, raising a silent alarm for help while documenting the crime in progress without drawing attention?  Any sensing technology could be used as an input for this system, particularly one which can be operated without awareness by others.

     A simple panic button would be to use an eye tracker or eyelid movement detector on a head­mounted system.  It is known that blinking a "song" pattern with one's eyes is detectable. The timing of the blinks is used as a signal to "unlock" a device.  So blinking a particular pattern or rhythm can be used as a signal; useful blink patterns are rare and generally blink patterns would not be obvious to others in the vicinity. The system can add a "confirmation" where a dialog pops up that says "Blink twice to confirm Panic Button".  And if the user does not in 5 seconds, it doesn't activate, just as a ba...