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Multi positional gate for stapled & unstapled papers in a high speed finisher

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000229385D
Publication Date: 2013-Jul-25
Document File: 6 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This idea proposes a rotatable and movable gate that would allow a position for unstapled sheets of paper vs. the stapled sets. The gate in its rotated up position would stop the sheets that do not need to be stapled earlier in the paper path. Sheets destined to become stapled sets would have to go along the top of the gate when it is rotated flat to the registration guide into the throat of the stapler assembly. After the sets have been stapled and need to be ejected backward onto the shelf, the gate would slide back toward the stapler sheet stop to allow the stapled set to be ejected faster because the shelf is shorter.

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Multi positional gate for stapled & unstapled papers in a high speed finisher

This idea proposes a rotatable and movable gate that would allow a position for unstapled sheets of paper vs. the stapled sets. The gate in its rotated up position would stop the sheets that do not need to be stapled earlier in the paper path. Sheets destined to become stapled sets would have to go along the top of the gate when it is rotated flat to the registration guide into the throat of the stapler assembly. After the sets have been stapled and need to be ejected backward onto the shelf, the gate would slide back toward the stapler sheet stop to allow the stapled set to be ejected faster because the shelf is shorter.

Copiers / printers that offer stapled sets typically use a common registration wall or guide for unstapled or stapled sheets of paper in their finisher devices. The sheets are then typically moved forward or through the stapler assembly out onto a shelf or catch tray. Some finisher devices do not eject the sheets forward and actually drop the sheets below or behind the registration wall onto an elevator or stacker tray. The problem with this style of design is that it takes more time in the feed cycle because the sheets are not moving forward in the process direction but backward. This causes a delay with the arrival of the next sheets of paper which affects machine productivity. Also, having a common registration wall limits the set size for unstapled sets because currently most staplers only staple 100 sheets of paper.

This proposal is the introduction of a 3 position (rotatable and movable) gate that would allow a position for unstapled sheets of paper vs. the stapled sets. The gate (rotated up- position #1) would stop the sheets that do not need to be stapled earlier in the paper path. The sheets would hit the gate and fall downward onto the elevator or stacking device which is located below the gate. Sheets destined to become a stapled set would have to go along the top of the gate (rotated flat - position #2) to the registration guide into the throat of the stapler assembly....