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Method and System for Utilizing Architectures to Share Information within a Group of Autonomous Machines Leveraging Presence Technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000233936D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-02
Document File: 5 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and system is disclosed for utilizing architectures to share information within a group of autonomous machines leveraging presence technology. The method and system proposes two different configurations of interconnected machines that utilize the presence technology to publish Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) messages or subscribe to Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) messages. The method and system also provides a mechanism to dynamically add one or more machines to a subgroup of machines, when machines in a subgroup fail.

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Method and System for Utilizing Architectures to Share Information within a Group of Autonomous Machines Leveraging Presence Technology

Disclosed is a method and system for utilizing architectures to share information within a group of autonomous machines leveraging presence technology. The method and system provides several architectures (configurations) that are used to publish or subscribe Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) messages and dynamically add one or more machines to a subgroup of machines, when machines in a subgroup fail. The method and system utilizes presence technology for publishing or subscribing the SIP messages and the machines communicate in either a planned or an ad hoc manner.

In a first configuration, each machine installs a presence server and each machine registers with an Internet Protocol (IP) network. Each machine subscribes to presence server of other machines with in a subgroup and within a larger group. After registering, each machine gets a unique IP machine and publishes a register message to all other machines. In response to the published message, machines that intend to subscribe to the message, send a subscribe message to the originating machine which published the message. The originating machine then sends an acknowledgment including IP and Media Access Control (MAC) address. After sending the acknowledgement, the originating machine adds the machines as subscribers. This way each machine subscribes to all other machines' presence server. Each machine builds its presence information documents, known as presentities, and each machine publishes its presentities to its local presence server. The machine publishes its presentities either periodically or upon any change. Other subscribers receive notifications of new presence information based on publish information of the presentities. Individuals, groups, and subgroups take actions based upon their current workload, requirement of other machines and notifications. The originating machine identifies events of interest and publishes the events to its presence server. The presence server then notifies all the other machines, with in the subgroup and the larger group, which are subscribed to the events. The machines communicate about the interested events with very short and precise messaging technology which requires minimal processing. This configuration enables all the machines to operate as masters and a machine to subscribe to multiple and different events of interest. In addition, the configuration provides a robust mechanism to ensure that the communication exists even after failure of one of the machines and enable machines to make decisions based upon the presence states of other machines. Dynamic subgroups are also created to allow handling of events like destroying of machines or machines inaccessible to the presence servers. The formation of subgroups occurs as subscriptions expire from machines that are no longer alive or reachable ov...